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Shaping the Future of Science

Education. Discovery. Innovation.

Departments & Programs

Chemistry and Biochemistry
Geoscience
Life Sciences
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Physics and Astronomy
Radiochemistry
Water Resources Management
Pre-Professional Programs
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$ 12,576,500
AWARDS RECEIVED IN FY 2020
2,754
Students
84.9 %
1st year retention rate of Fall 2019 student cohort

Novel Coronavirus – COVID-19

UNLV is committed to safely providing education and promoting a healthy environment that supports the well-being of our students, faculty and staff.

What’s Happening

Hoover Dam
Dec. 30, 2022

The problems facing our world and how UNLV helped find solutions.

Ph.D. engineering graduate George William Kajjumba is hooded during the Spring 2022 commencement ceremony
Dec. 28, 2022

Student achievements including competition wins, a science fellowship first, and new innovations splashed local and national news headlines in 2022.

A laser beam emitting a blue light is projected into a diamond anvil cell
Dec. 27, 2022

Groundbreaking discovery was the norm for Rebel researchers in 2022. Here's a selection of our favorite news-making UNLV research highlights from the year. 

man giving presentation with powerpoint behind him
Dec. 15, 2022

International student and biological sciences Ph.D. candidate Santiago Bataller places first in Rebel Grad Slam Competition.

Graduation cap with "22" tassle
Dec. 14, 2022

Five UNLV graduates will be recognized by President Keith E. Whitfield during winter commencement for their combination of academic excellence and service to the community.
 

rendering of gamma-ray burst
Dec. 7, 2022

A long-duration gamma-ray burst observed in late 2021 revealed signatures typically associated with short-duration bursts, forcing puzzled scientists to create a new model for the origin of this unique burst.

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In the News

PolitiFact
Experts say that while minerals within rocks can conduct electricity, rocks cannot store it or function as batteries on their own.
KTNV-TV: ABC 13
A minuscule bit of material in you car's exhaust system is attracting thieves, causing big headaches and costing victims thousands in repair bills.
Associated Press
As proof, social media users shared a video showing several people inspecting a small, shiny rock. One of the individuals connects two ends of what appears to be a wire to the rock, which activates a light on the wire. “Electrically charged stones discovered in the Democratic Republic of the Congo,” one Twitter user who shared the video wrote Saturday. The tweet was shared over 27,000 times.

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Accomplishments

Jan. 24, 2023
Monika Neda and Jorge Reyes (both Mathematical Sciences) co-authored a publication with colleagues Leo Rebholz (Clemson), Sean Ingimarson (Clemson), and An Vu (U of Houston) titled, "Improved long time accuracy for projection methods for Navier-Stokes equations using EMAC formulation," in the…
Jan. 12, 2023
Pejmon Sadri (Mathematical Sciences) recently published a paper titled, "Lessons From Gathering of Crop Production Statistics in India: A Comparison of Methods Used Before and After the Bengal Famine of 1943 – 1944," in the Journal of Applied Statistics and Machine Learning.

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Experts

Headshot of Allen Gibbs
Professor of Life Sciences

An expert in insect physiology and evolution.

Headshot of Nora Caberoy
Lincy Associate Professor of Life Sciences

Nora Caberoy is an expert on eye diseases, specifically the factors and pathways associated with damage of the retina. 

Headshot of Ernesto Abel-Santos
Professor, Biochemistry

An expert in biochemistry.

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