Student holding test tubes and examining their content

College of Sciences News

The College of Sciences provides students a solid foundation in natural, physical, and mathematical sciences for a successful career in the sciences and other professional programs.

Current Sciences News

Students in red shirts walking outside on campus
Business and Community | December 30, 2019

A collection of news stories from 2019 highlighting UNLV's impact in Southern Nevada and beyond.

UNLV professor Matthew Lachniet works in his lab on campus.
People | December 27, 2019

A collection of stories highlighting UNLV faculty and students who made the news in 2019.

unlv professor arya udry looks at a meteorite that she's holding up to the light
Research | December 26, 2019

A collection of stories featuring interesting discoveries driven by UNLV that have made news in 2019.

UNLV students in red caps/gowns hugging at commencement
Campus News | December 17, 2019

UNLV president Marta Meana will highlight four graduating students at commencement who embody the academic, research, and community impact of the Class of 2019.

A man in a labcoat sit near a computer
Research | December 17, 2019

Rebel Grad Slam winner Nam Hoang’s research focuses on how tumors trick the body into feeding them, and how to stop it.

Student in white medical coat stands in front of medical equipment
People | November 4, 2019

A UNLV alum and current med school student says the Engelstad Scholars Program solidified his desire to help others.

Sciences In The News

KSNV-TV: News 3
January 23, 2020

The whole concept of an electromagnetic pulse sounds like science fiction, but they are very real.

Quartz
January 17, 2020

No one enjoys boarding an airplane. It’s slow, it’s inefficient, and often undignified. And that’s without even getting into the ethical quandary of so-called gate lice, the anxious passengers who cluster at the gate before their group is called. But at least one part of the process doesn’t need to be disrupted. When it comes to shunting slow-moving passengers to the front of the queue, such as those requiring assistance or with small children, the airlines have it exactly right.

Ars Technica
January 15, 2020

Commercial airlines often prioritize boarding for passengers traveling with small children, or for those who need extra assistance—in other words, those likely to be slower to stow their bags and take their seats—before starting to board the faster passengers. It's counter-intuitive, but it turns out that letting slower passengers board first actually results in a more efficient process and less time before takeoff, according to a new paper in Physical Review E.

San Francisco Chronicle
December 20, 2019

Dr. Ming-Wei Wu drives his son and daughter to the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and escorts them to and from classes.

U.S. News & World Report
December 20, 2019

Dr. Ming-Wei Wu drives his son and daughter to the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and escorts them to and from classes.

Astronomy
December 13, 2019

Molecules containing noble gases shouldn’t exist. By definition, these chemical elements — helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon and radon — are the party poopers of the periodic table, huddling in the rightmost column and refusing to make molecules. Indeed, no one has ever seen any naturally occurring noble gas molecules on Earth. Earlier this decade, though, astronomers accidentally discovered one of these aloof elements in molecules in space.

Sciences Experts

An expert on bacterial gene regulation and bacterial pathogens, including E. coli, Shigella, and Salmonella. 
Lachniet is an expert in paleoclimatology, quaternary geology, climate change and stable isotope geochemistry.
Brian Hedlund in an expert in microbial ecology at high temperatures, biofuels and genomics. 
An expert in earthquakes, structural geology, tectonics, and neotectonics.
An expert on desert ecology and climate change.
An expert in biochemistry.

Recent Sciences Accomplishments

January 22, 2020
Satish C. Bhatnagar (Math) presented a paper, "Making Proofs Palatable," at the annual Joint Mathematics Meeting held in Denver earlier this month. The travel to the conference was partially supported by the University Faculty Travel Committee.  
January 10, 2020
Eduardo Robleto (Life Sciences) is the new program director INBRE program. His responsibilities are to oversee the INBRE-sponsored faculty research and undergraduate research components of the grant, which covers all NSHE institutions in Nevada. The annual direct budget he will manage directly is approximately $400,000.  Nevada INBRE is part of...
December 20, 2019
Kelly Tseng (Life Sciences) was an invited speaker at the 2019 Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students in Anaheim, California. Her talk, "A Lot of Nerve! Evolutionary Mechanisms of Neural Regeneration," presented her laboratory group's recent research studies on vertebrate eye regeneration. 
December 12, 2019
Elizabeth Stacy (Life Sciences) and collaborators Michael Purugganan and Jae Young Choi (New York University) published a paper in Molecular Biology and Evolution, "Divergent Selection and Primary Gene Flow Shape Incipient Speciation of a Riparian Tree on Hawaii Island."  This work uses population genomics approaches to uncover the evolutionary...
December 11, 2019
Cindy Kha, Dylan Guerin, and Kelly Tseng (Life Sciences) published a book chapter, "Studying In Vivo Retinal Progenitor Cell Proliferation in Xenopus laevis" in Retinal Development: Methods and Protocols." This is part of the highly successful Methods in Molecular Biology book series published since 1983. The work from Kha, Guerin, and Tseng ...
December 10, 2019
Jason Steffen (Physics and Astronomy) was recognized as a 2019 "Highly Cited Researcher" by the Web of Science.  This places him, by citations, in the top one percent of his field over the decade 2008 through 2018.  Most of these citations come from his work in exoplanets, especially in conjunction with NASA's Kepler mission.  Steffen is an...