Carrie Tyler

Professor, UNLV Department of Geoscience
Expertise: Marine conservation, Paleobiology, Paleoecology, Evolution of marine invertebrates, Taphonomy

Biography

Carrie Tyler is a marine conservation paleobiologist whose research focuses on understanding the evolution of underwater ecosystems, particularly how marine food webs respond to dramatic change, and the relationship between biodiversity and marine food webs throughout ancient history to modern day.

Tyler, who joined UNLV's faculty in 2022, examines the effects of prey consumption and environmental changes on ecosystems — especially in the modern rocky intertidal, or range between high and low tide lines. Her work also seeks to assess the quality of fossils and determine ways to use that information to inform paleoecology, as well as conservation law and policy.

In addition to wrestling with topics such as past climate change and natural resources, students in Tyler's classes also learn about ecosystem functioning and recovery, habitat loss, and mass extinction.

Education

  • Ph.D., Geosciences, Virginia Tech
  • M.S., Geological and Earth Sciences/Geosciences, San Diego University
  • B.A., Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder

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Carrie Tyler In The News

Deeper Blue
Researchers from the University of Nevada Las Vegas have published findings in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, highlighting how by looking at marine food web fossils, we can get a glimpse into the future of climate change effects.
Nature World News
Have we damaged marine life too much for it to recover?
Science Daily
What a tangled web we weave. Well, when it comes to the climate crisis' impact on marine food webs, we apparently didn't know the half of it. That's according to a new UNLV study which compared ancient and modern ocean ecosystems in a bid to understand how to make them healthier and more resilient.
Phys.org
What a tangled web we weave. When it comes to the impact of the climate crisis on marine food webs, we apparently have not known the half of it. That's according to a new University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) study, which compared ancient and modern ocean ecosystems in a bid to understand how to make them healthier and more resilient.

Articles Featuring Carrie Tyler