In The News: Department of Psychology

Washington Post
October 6, 2017

When she was under fire, dodging bullets at the Route 91 Harvest festival on Sunday, Megan Greene felt an odd sense of purpose. "If you're still breathing, you're fine," she told a panicky woman trying to escape with her mother, who uses a wheelchair.

Las Vegas Review Journal
October 6, 2017

Jill Roberts heard the screaming and crying in the Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center emergency room Sunday night as the families and friends of those killed in the Route 91 Harvest music festival shooting found out their loved ones didn’t survive the attack.

Mother Jones
October 4, 2017

Christie White, 46, smiles thinking of her last peaceful memory. It was a girls’ weekend. It was Sunday night. Christie and Dani and Beth were hanging out in the perfect late-summer weather under glimmering Las Vegas lights with some cocktails, and their favorite country bands.

Stat News
October 4, 2017

The volunteer psychologists and counselors have been pouring into this grieving city, so fast that a state official says the supply far exceeds the demand for crisis counseling.

NPR
October 3, 2017

We often think of first responders mainly as police, fire and emergency-medical professionals. In Las Vegas on Monday, NPR's Eric Westervelt found a small volunteer army of mental-health professionals, trauma counselors, psychiatrists and social workers who quickly fanned out to help some of the thousands who had witnessed the massacre up close.

News Medical
September 27, 2017

After four years of lab testing and complex neuro-decoding, a research team led by UNLV psychology professor James Hyman has struck a major breakthrough that could open the floodgates for research into the anterior cingulate cortex, or ACC, and how human brains learn.

Science Daily
September 26, 2017

After four years of lab testing and complex neuro-decoding, a research team led by UNLV psychology professor James Hyman has struck a major breakthrough that could open the floodgates for research into the anterior cingulate cortex, or ACC, and how human brains learn.

Las Vegas Review Journal
September 1, 2017

An undocumented immigrant has a baby. If she’s eligible for protection from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, the chances her child will have mental health issues are cut by half. That’s the conclusion of a Stanford University study released Thursday, which examined the use of mental health services of children born in the United States to undocumented immigrant parents. Even though the children studied were natural-born citizens themselves, having an undocumented parent made it more likely they would eventually be diagnosed with an anxiety disorder.

KLAS-TV: 8 News Now
July 28, 2017

The stabbing death of a 4-year-old child is shedding light on the larger issue of domestic violence in the Las Vegas valley.

Fox 21 News
July 10, 2017

Right now many parts of the country are dealing with extremely hot summer days. Here in southern Colorado, we’ve been in the 90s and even 100s in Pueblo. But it’s even hotter in Arizona and Nevada.

The Conversation
May 4, 2017

Emotional intelligence can mean the difference between behaving in a socially acceptable way and being considered to be way out of line. While most people will have heard of emotional intelligence, not many people really know how to spot it – in themselves or in others.

University Herald
January 24, 2017

Math anxiety can be a serious and prevalent problem not just for students but also for some professionals. You have this specific anxiety when soon as numbers and computations are encountered, your palm starts sweating and your heart begins to race.