In The News: Department of Psychology

The Conversation
May 4, 2017

Emotional intelligence can mean the difference between behaving in a socially acceptable way and being considered to be way out of line. While most people will have heard of emotional intelligence, not many people really know how to spot it – in themselves or in others.

University Herald
January 24, 2017

Math anxiety can be a serious and prevalent problem not just for students but also for some professionals. You have this specific anxiety when soon as numbers and computations are encountered, your palm starts sweating and your heart begins to race.

Science News for Students
January 5, 2017

As your teacher passes out the math test, your palms turn sweaty. You notice that your heart has begun to race. Glancing down at the page, you suddenly forget those operations on which you had drilled only a few days earlier. Do you perform all additions first in a complex calculation, or all multiplications? What’s the multiplication table again for 9’s? Oh, you know it — well you’re pretty sure, right? Suddenly, you start to doubt a lot of things that you “know.”

PsyPost
January 5, 2017

New research published in the journal Sex Roles examined how women who choose to keep their own surname after marriage are perceived in the United States.

Bustle
January 5, 2017

In news that will probably surprise absolutely no one, new research has shown that women who don’t change their names when they get married are perceived by other people to be much less committed to their marriages than those who do are.

Freundin
January 5, 2017

In the context of equal rights, it has been possible for women since 1976 in Germany to choose their own last name at a wedding ceremony to the family name. Scientists from UNLV have now conducted a study in the United States examining how women who keep their maiden name are seen by their fellow humans.

RedOrbit
January 5, 2017

It considers the opinion of more than 900 female undergraduates and just under 300 male undergrads on the topic, revealing that those women who chose to keep their surnames are perceived to be less committed to marriage.

The Daily Dot
January 4, 2017

A new study of college students reveals that, despite many feminist ideas becoming more mainstream, we’re still punishing women for not changing their name for heterosexual marriage. The study, which questioned far more women than men, showed undergraduate students think women who don’t change their names weren’t as committed to their spouses.

Las Vegas Review Journal
November 7, 2016

Most parents probably would like for their children to become interested in current events and how government works, and might even hope that they’ll someday come to appreciate the majesty of the American political system and the United States’ long electoral tradition.

Las Vegas Review Journal
October 27, 2016

Experts from across the valley have taken a hard look at both the city and state’s mental health care situation, and most agreed that, in order to fix things, it will take time, new professionals and lots of money. “Mental health funding draws from several fronts, and there is room for growth in all those fronts,” said Jim Jobin, president of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. “Nevada has the fewest clinicians of any state — that’s providers who can sit with you and know what to do. In Nevada, only one in three adults that has mental illness will be able to get help. Only one in two children who have severe mental illness can get any help. There’s not enough of us to go around.”

Las Vegas Review Journal
September 28, 2016

I’m not sure Colin Kaepernick knew it would reach this level of interest when he first sat down and later took a knee. That’s the funny thing about movements. There’s no telling how many people will assemble behind a shared purpose.

The Chronicle of Higher Education
September 28, 2016

College professors might end up staring in the mirror in response to a recent study led by R. Shane Westfall, a doctoral student in experimental psychology at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. Building upon other researchers’ findings that people attribute positive characteristics to those who are relatively attractive, Mr. Westfall has concluded that good-looking instructors might have another advantage: Their students learn more.