Introduction

The College of Fine Arts has an obligation to inform students and faculty of health and safety issues, hazards, and procedures inherent in practice, performance, and teaching both in general and as applicable to their specific specializations. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Information regarding hearing, nutrition, vocal and musculoskeletal health, and injury prevention.
  • The use, proper handling, and operation of potentially dangerous materials, equipment, and technology.

Each unit of the College of Fine Arts has developed policies, protocols, and operational procedures to guard against injury and illness, as well as to raise the awareness among our students of the connections between performers' health, the suitability and safety of equipment and technology, and the acoustic and other health-related conditions in the university's practice, rehearsal, and performance facilities.

It is important to note that health and safety depend largely on personal decisions made by informed individuals. UNLV has health and safety responsibilities, but fulfillment of these responsibilities cannot and will not ensure any individual's health and safety. Too many factors beyond UNLV's control are involved. Each individual is personally responsible for avoiding risk and preventing injuries to themselves before, during, and after study or employment in the UNLV College of Fine Arts. Policies, protocols, and operational procedures developed by the college do not alter or cancel any individual's personal responsibility, or in any way shift personal responsibility for the results of any individual's personal decisions or actions in any instance or over time to the university.

General Guidelines

In order to establish and nurture a climate of health promotion:

  • All college personnel are encouraged to follow Fine Arts health guidelines as posted on the CFA CHIP website (https://www.unlv.edu/finearts/chip/health), as well as on departmental websites.
  • Students are encouraged to discuss arts-related health concerns with faculty involved (e.g., applied teachers, directors, etc.). Faculty members serve as the "first line of defense."
  • Faculty should include arts wellness information within course syllabi. Example language is:

UNLV College of Fine Arts is committed to empowering its students with education about health issues and support for injury prevention and recovery. Students are encouraged to discuss with faculty any issues related to physical health, psychological health, nutritional health and hearing conservation. Student information sheets can be found on the CFA Consortium for Health and Injury Prevention website at: https://www.unlv.edu/finearts/chip/health

  • Members of the CFA Consortium for Health and Injury Prevention shall be available to all CFA students, faculty, and staff to consult on health promotion issues.
  • Rehearsals in which College of Fine Arts personnel participate should have regularly scheduled breaks that take into consideration student and faculty physical and mental health.
  • Students and faculty should recognize the importance of time management, so that the workloads related to the creation of art do not become overwhelming, and upset a healthy work-life balance.
  • Whenever possible, large-scale productions and large ensemble performances shall not be scheduled during study week and finals week. Faculty should make every effort to honor the intent of study week and finals week.
  • CFA faculty, students and staff will abide by NSHE policies against discrimination and sexual harassment.
  • UNLV’s drug and alcohol abuse prevention program for students is governed by the Student Conduct Code, the Alcohol Response Policy and Guidelines, and the Controlled Substance Response Policy. All three policies are available on the Office of Student Conduct Website at https://www.unlv.edu/studentconduct/forms.

Facilities and Equipment

  • For any rehearsal and practice venues, studios, performance spaces, or work areas where noise levels may be in excess of the 85 dB threshold, foam ear protection will be made available to students and faculty. The 85 dB threshold has been established by the National Institute for Occupational safety and Health (NIOSH). Faculty who supervise students in these areas should discuss hearing conservation with their students, and be willing to make reasonable accommodations for students.
  • Instruments and equipment supplied by the programs within the College of Fine Arts for student and faculty use shall fit the user as ergonomically as possible (e.g., chairs, supports for large musical instruments, etc.).
  • Any students required to use, handle or operate potentially dangerous materials, equipment and technology will receive appropriate training from staff. Staff members will be involved in all large equipment moves and large stage set-up. Policies for working with and moving equipment will be established by individual units, and will be made easily accessible to students.

In Case Of Injury

  • Anyone with Fine Arts related health concerns should see an appropriate healthcare specialist. The CFA Consortium for Health and Injury Prevention is available to help find and expedite access to health resources.
  • Students who experience performance-related disorders will be excused from lessons and rehearsals as deemed necessary by authorized medical personnel.
  • Students who experience performance-related disabilities that require further accommodations should obtain an Accommodation from the Disability Resource Center.

Additional Information for Students

The information below is based on recommendations by the NASM-PAMA Advisories on Neuromusculoskeletal and Vocal Health.

Protecting Your Neuromusculoskeletal Health

Student Information Sheet
Provided by CFA CHIP (Consortium for Health and Injury Prevention)

  • Welcome to University of Nevada Las Vegas College of Fine Arts!

  • Neuromusculoskeletal health is essential to your lifelong success in the performing arts.

  • The CFA Consortium for Health and Injury Prevention will work with you to keep you healthy.

  • Practicing and performing is physically demanding.

  • Performers are susceptible to numerous neuromusculoskeletal disorders.

  • Many neuromusculoskeletal disorders and conditions are preventable and/or treatable.

  • Some musculoskeletal disorders are related to behavior; others are genetic; still others are the result of trauma or injury. Some genetic conditions can increase a person’s risk of developing certain behavior- related neuromusculoskeletal disorders.

  • Day-to-day decisions can impact your neuromusculoskeletal health, both now and in the future.

  • Sufficient physical and mental warm-up time is important.

  • Proper body alignment and correct physical technique are essential.

  • Regular breaks during practice and rehearsal are vital in order to prevent undue physical stress and strain.

  • It is important to set a reasonable limit on the amount of time that you will practice in a day.

  • Avoid sudden increases in practice times.

  • Know your body and its limits, and avoid “overdoing it.”

  • Maintain healthy habits. Safeguard your physical and mental health.

  • Since muscle and joint strains and a myriad of other injuries can occur in and out of school, you also need to learn more and take care of your own neuromusculoskeletal health on a daily basis, particularly with regard to your performing medium and area of specialization.

  • If you are concerned about your personal neuromusculoskeletal health, talk with a medical professional.

  • If you are concerned about your neuromusculoskeletal health in relationship to your program of study, consult the CFA Clinic for Health and Injury Prevention at https://www.unlv.edu/finearts/chip/cfa, and/or UNLV Student Wellness Center at: www.unlv.edu/studentwellness/health-center.

  • To learn more about health issues of performing artists, and how to avoid injury, then consider enrolling in one of the following courses currently offered by the College of Fine Arts:

DAN 108 Pilates

DAN 351 Dance Kinesiology

DAN 451 Prevention of Injury

MUS 417, 746 Vocal Pedagogy

MUS 480, 580 The Healthy Musician

MUS 748 Music Wellness

Protecting Your Vocal Health

Student Information Sheet
Provided by CFA CHIP (Consortium for Health and Injury Prevention)

  • Welcome to University of Nevada Las Vegas College of Fine Arts! 

  • Vocal health is important for all performing artists and essential to lifelong success for singers.

  • Understanding basic care of the voice is essential for performing artists who speak, sing, and rehearse or teach others.

  • Practicing, rehearsing, and performing is physically demanding.

  • Performing artists are susceptible to numerous vocal disorders. Many vocal disorders and conditions are preventable and/or treatable.

  • Sufficient warm-up time is important.

  • Begin warming up mid-range, and then slowly work outward to vocal pitch extremes.

  • Proper alignment, adequate breath support, and correct physical technique are essential.

  • Regular breaks during practice and rehearsal are vital in order to prevent undue physical or vocal stress and strain.

  • It is important to set a reasonable limit on the amount of time that you will practice in a day. Avoid sudden increases in practice times.

  • Know your voice and its limits, and avoid overdoing it or misusing it.

  • Maintain healthy habits. Safeguard your physical and mental health.

  • Drink plenty of water in order to keep your vocal folds adequately lubricated. Limit your use of alcohol, and avoid smoking.

  • Day-to-day decisions can impact your vocal health, both now and in the future.

  • Since vocal strain and a myriad of other injuries can occur in and out of school, you also need to learn more and take care of your own vocal health on a daily basis. Avoid shouting, screaming, or other strenuous vocal use.

  • If you are concerned about your personal vocal health, talk with a medical professional.

  • If you are concerned about your vocal health in relationship to your program of study, consult the CFA Clinic for Health and Injury Prevention at: https://www.unlv.edu/finearts/chip/cfa, and/or UNLV Student Wellness Center at: www.unlv.edu/studentwellness/health-center.

  • To learn more about health issues of performing artists, and how to avoid injury, then consider enrolling in one of the following courses currently offered by the College of Fine Arts:

MUS 417, 746 Vocal Pedagogy

MUS 480, 580 The Healthy Musician

MUS 748 Music Wellness