Topic: environment

A hiker descends the Angels Landing route in Zion National Park
Research | September 13, 2016
As the National Park Service celebrates its 100th anniversary, UNLV professor Scott Abella explores the conservation challenges officials face.
Scott Abella
Business and Community | August 4, 2016
UNLV professor Scott Abella on why national parks matter more than ever to everyone from foodies to Civil War historians to the average Joe sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic.
Mario Verduzco
People | July 27, 2016
Engineering student turns study abroad experience into internship that taught him the value of improvising.
Naomi Lewis
People | July 22, 2016
Environmental studies major Naomi Lewis finds a practical application for her passion at a nonprofit.
Mike Vardakis
People | July 21, 2016
Undergraduate Mike Vardakis couldn’t settle on his academic path until an internship showed him the possibilities.
Lake Mead
Business and Community | July 19, 2016
Why two Saltman Center experts say mediation is key to resolving the water woes of the American West.
Lake Mead
Research | February 10, 2016
As water leaders contend with unprecedented drought and demand, will the river people of the Colorado band together as regional citizens? Water policy expert Patricia Mulroy weighs in.
Eric Strain
People | February 1, 2016
The new architecture professor on the importance of sketching and what it will take to make Las Vegas "sustainable."
An artist’s rendering of UNLV’s entry in the 2017 Solar Decathalon.
Campus News | January 25, 2016
Students to build sustainable, “age-in-place” home with consumer appeal for U.S. Department of Energy contest; UNLV team finished second overall in 2013.
Christmas tree bulb
Business and Community | December 21, 2015
Christmas tree recycling begins Dec. 26 at more than 30 locations in Southern Nevada.
Penny Amy speaks to assistants
Research | November 1, 2015
Microbiology professor Penny Amy leads a formidable team in honeycomb warfare.
dry grass at red rock canyon
Research | July 10, 2015
82 percent of America’s three largest national parks are infested with at least one type of foreign foliage that’s ripe for becoming brushfire kindling.