Jefferson Kinney

Founding Chair, Department of Brain Health
Expertise: Behavioral neuroscience, Alzheimer's disease, Schizophrenia, Learning and memory systems

Biography

Jefferson Kinney is the founding chair of the department of brain health in the School of Integrated Health Sciences. Kinney investigates neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, and Parkinson's disease, with a focus on cellular and molecular changes in the brain that underlie these disorders. 

His current work includes investigating the role of several risk factors associated with Alzheimer’s disease and subtle changes in cell function, including interactions between diabetes and inflammation in the brain throughout the onset and progression of the disease. As part of this work, Kinney collaborates with the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas. 

Earlier in his career, Kinney completed an Intramural Research Training Fellowship with the National Institute of Mental Health and the Helen Dorris Fellowship in schizophrenia research at The Scripps Research Institute.

Education

  • B.S., Psychology, Colorado State University
  • M.S., Experimental Psychology, Colorado State University
  • Ph.D., Behavioral Neuroscience, Colorado State University

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Jefferson Kinney In The News

Philanthropy News Digest
June 22, 2020
The University of Nevada, Las Vegas has announced a $6 million commitment from Joy Chambers-Grundy and the late Reg Grundy to establish a center dedicated to research on and the treatment of neurological disorders.
Newswise
June 15, 2020
The UNLV department of brain health has formally launched the Chambers-Grundy Center for Transformative Neuroscience, offering hope through scientific discovery for patients who are suffering from Alzheimer’s, dementia and other brain and neurological diseases.
Associated Press
January 27, 2020
The Pentagon disclosed on Friday that 34 U.S. service members suffered traumatic brain injuries in Iran’s missile strike this month on an Iraqi air base, and although half have returned to work, the casualty total belies President Donald Trump’s initial claim that no Americans were harmed. He later characterized the injuries as “not very serious.”
Bloomberg
January 24, 2020
The Pentagon disclosed on Friday that 34 U.S. service members suffered traumatic brain injuries in Iran's missile strike this month on an Iraqi air base, and although half have returned to work, the casualty total belies President Donald Trump's initial claim that no Americans were harmed. He later characterized the injuries as “not very serious.”

Articles Featuring Jefferson Kinney

artist rendering of brain
Campus NewsJune 15, 2020
The Chambers-Grundy Center for Transformative Neuroscience will advance research and the science of treatment for Alzheimer’s and other neurological disorders.
Campus NewsFebruary 18, 2020
A collection of news stories capturing the excitement and accomplishments of UNLV at the start of a new decade.
UNLV professor Matthew Lachniet works in his lab on campus.
PeopleDecember 27, 2019
A collection of stories highlighting UNLV faculty and students who made the news in 2019.
A portrait of Jefferson Kinney in front of a brain scan.
ResearchDecember 4, 2019
UNLV’s new Department of Brain Health leads interdisciplinary effort to answer tough questions about traumatic brain injury.