In The News: Department of Brain Health

KNPR News
May 17, 2022

Right now, Nevada has the third-fastest rate of growth for Alzheimer’s disease. Between now and 2025, the number of Nevadans with dementia is expected to grow almost 31% from 49,000 to 64,000.

360 Dx
May 11, 2022

The test, which measures β-amyloid in cerebrospinal fluid, received FDA de novo classification, making it the first IVD available for detection of brain amyloid plaques.

PBS
May 6, 2022

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and according to a report released in April by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the COVID-19 pandemic worsened the mental health issues that adolescents had already been experiencing.

Sierra Booster
April 16, 2022

In the first decade of the last century a young German psychiatrist discovered a new disease. But it took the worldwide medical community some seven decades to fully acknowledge the devastating impact of Dr. Alois Alzheimer’s diagnosis. As a result the “A-word” now has a particularly scary connotation for senior citizens. Perhaps it is because it is normal to experience memory loss as we age.

Neurology Live
March 15, 2022

Since the early 2000s, the advances in biomarker testing have allowed clinicians to detect and diagnose Alzheimer disease (AD) and other related dementias more accurately. Given that no single biomarker test alone has been proven to diagnose the condition, the available biomarkers are often used in conjunction. While biomarkers have become an important part of research and hold critical value in the future of AD drug development, there has been no consensus as to which biomarkers hold the most value.

Neurology Live
March 11, 2022

Recently, the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), announced a newly awarded grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to fund phase 2 of their first Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE), the Center for Neurodegeneration and Translational Neuroscience (CNTN). The grant, totaling $11.3 million, will be used towards developing the resources and processes necessary to achieve a long-term sustainable neuroscience research infrastructure.

Las Vegas Weekly
March 4, 2022

Home to a shiny school of medicine and a developing “medical district,” Southern Nevada has bolstered its medical bona fides in recent years. For researcher Samantha John, the region’s diverse population was another key element drawing her here.

Trial Site News
March 2, 2022

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) of The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a grant expected to total $11.3 million to fund phase 2 of southern Nevada’s first Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE): The Center for Neurodegeneration and Translational Neuroscience (CNTN). The funding will allow for an additional five years of continued collaboration between Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) to enhance neuroscience research infrastructure in southern Nevada. The award is co-led by Aaron Ritter, M.D., of the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health and Jefferson Kinney, Ph.D. of the Department of Brain Health at UNLV.

KVVU-TV: Fox 5
February 23, 2022

The National Institute of Health is awarding $11.3 million for neuroscience research in Nevada.

KSNV-TV: News 3
February 18, 2022

UNLV and the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health have received an $11.3 million federal grant to continue their joint research into brain diseases.

Las Vegas Review Journal
February 17, 2022

UNLV and the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health have received an $11.3 million federal grant for the next phase of their joint research into the causes of degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s and potential treatments.

BioNews
February 9, 2022

A recent proposal that Medicare only cover Aduhelm (aducanumab) for patients with Alzheimer’s disease who are enrolled in clinical trials is needlessly restrictive, and will prevent many people from accessing a medication that may be able to help them.