Sara K. Rosenkranz

Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences
Expertise: Nutrition, Exercise and physical activity, Cardiometabolic health

Biography

Sara K. Rosenkranz is an expert on the interactions between nutrition and physical activity, as well as the influence of lifestyle on cardiovascular and metabolic health — including blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and inflammation.

Her research has examined topics such as the body's ability to digest starch; how eating strawberries impacts health; and the ways sedentary behavior affects chronic disease health outcomes.

Rosenkranz is an American College of Sports Medicine-certified exercise physiologist and a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association and International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. The certified triathlon coach's studies have been published in peer-reviewed outlets including Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, Journal of Child Nutrition and Management, and International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology.

Education

  • Ph.D., Human Nutrition, Kansas State University
  • M.S., Kinesiology, Kansas State University
  • B.A., Psychology, University of Kansas

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health & medicine

Sara K. Rosenkranz In The News

Medical Xpress
You might think electrolytes are some kind of lab-made superfuel for elite athletes and those who want to be like them. Electrolytes are indeed powerful, and in some circumstances, your body might benefit from a boost. But like comic book heroes with mild-mannered alter egos, they might already be hanging around in your life by another name. And like a movie franchise with one sequel too many, more is not always better.
American Heart Association
You might think electrolytes are some kind of lab-made superfuel for elite athletes and those who want to be like them. Electrolytes are indeed powerful, and in some circumstances, your body might benefit from a boost. But like comic book heroes with mild-mannered alter egos, they might already be hanging around in your life by another name. And like a movie franchise with one sequel too many, more is not always better.
The News International
A recent study published in Scientific Reports has found that strength training two to three times per week can be used as an effective treatment for arterial hypertension commonly known as high blood pressure. The researchers from School of Technology and Sciences Sao Paulo State University UNESP in Brazil looked at data from 14 studies featuring 253 participants.

Articles Featuring Sara K. Rosenkranz

Josh Hawkins, UNLV
Campus News | July 3, 2024

News highlights featuring UNLV students and staff who made (refreshing) waves in the headlines.