Nancy Lough

Professor, College of Education
Director of Marketing, College of Education
President, Sport Marketing Association
Expertise: Sport Marketing and Sponsorship, Women and Leadership, Title IX & Gender Equity

Biography

Nancy Lough is a professor in UNLV’s College of Education, where she also coordinates the College Sport Leadership certificate program. Her areas of expertise include sport marketing and sponsorship, development of women leaders, gender equity, and in sport. She has served as a consultant for Title IX issues in Nevada, Colorado, and New Mexico.

Recently, Lough served as editor of Sport Marketing Quarterly and the Journal of Contemporary Athletics, as well as the director of the Center for Sport Education Leadership at UNLV. She was the first female president of the Sport Marketing Association from 2013-15. As the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics (COIA) representative for UNLV, Dr. Lough serves as a voice for NCAA Division I faculty senates on issues in college sport. Additionally, Lough is an executive board member of the UNLV Women of Excellence, which works to raise funds for women’s sport; member of the Women’s Council, Dean’s Advisory Council; an advisory board member for the Penn State Center for Sports Business & Research, and UNLV PGA Management program, and University of Colorado Business of Sport certificate program. In addition she has conducted leadership training for a variety of organizations. He scholarly work has earned distinction meriting selection as a Sport Marketing Association Research Fellow.

She has been quoted extensively in media via outlets such as the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Canada’s Globe & Mail, and the Sports Business Journal.

Nancy Lough In The News

Authority Magazine
November 14, 2019
Conduct pay audits routinely. Inequities can be addressed more easily when they are small. Over time, salary issues tend to grow when no audit is done to create awareness of inequities. Equal pay is mandated by federal law for equal work. This also means stop justifying discrimination. The U.S. Soccer Federation is the most visible example of this: Instead of addressing the pay inequity, they hired two lobbying firms to advocate for their position. This money could have been spent on addressing the pay inequity issue.
PBS
September 20, 2019
Nevada has always been a leader in breaking gender barriers, but gender equality gaps in the workforce still exist and equity is a continuing challenge. This week we’re discussing where Nevada stands in closing key gender gaps like equal pay and equal representation in areas such as science, the arts, sports, and executive leadership.
New Books Network
August 26, 2019
Shortly after the conclusion of the Women’s World Cup earlier this summer, a friend suggested to me that it signaled the long-awaited arrival of soccer as a mainstream sport in the U.S. I thought a second, remembering the commercials around the game and the way the television cameras shot the crowd. Then I responded that I thought it wasn’t really the long-awaited arrival of soccer, but the emergence of women’s sports into the mainstream of American culture.
New York Times
August 6, 2019
For all of the claims that the N.B.A. (effectively the W.N.B.A.’s parent company) makes about women’s empowerment, the league disrespects its female athletes in multiple ways. Just as the unfair treatment of female soccer players has recently gotten attention, the situation in basketball deserves some, too.

Articles Featuring Nancy Lough

People preparing to cut ribbon on new Fertitta Complex
Campus NewsNovember 1, 2019
A collection of local, national, and international news stories highlighting the people and programs of UNLV.
U.S. Women's National Soccer Team lifts FIFA World Cup 2019 trophy as confetti and streamers rain down
ResearchJuly 23, 2019
UNLV sports and gender equity researcher Nancy Lough weighs in on the wage gap, marketing/sponsorship, and role of men and media in the sports industry.
fireworks and marquee
Campus NewsOctober 25, 2017
What will it take to unite the city behind its new hometown teams?