Matthew Lachniet

Professor of Geology
Expertise: Climate Change, Quaternary Geology, Paleoclimatology

Biography

Matthew Lachniet, a professor in the department of geoscience, focuses on understanding the controls on Earth’s climate on time scales ranging from seasonal to hundreds of thousands of years, with a particular focus on tropical, desert southwest, and arctic past climates. These data inform understanding of modern and anthropogenic climate change.

Lachniet uses light stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry, hydrology, speleology, glacial geology, geomorphology, and the sedimentary record to answer questions of paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic change. His primary research areas are Costa Rica, Panama, Mexico, Alaska, and the Great Basin. His research goal is to constrain past climate changes in these regions using proxy records. He is particularly interested in generating rainfall histories for Central America and to evaluate the climate forcings of climate change and variability in the neotropics.

Education

  • B.S., Geology, Antioch College
  • M.S., Geology, Michigan State University
  • Ph.D., Geology, Syracuse University

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science & technology, sustainability

Matthew Lachniet In The News

The Nevada Independent
October 4, 2019
To go big, sometimes you have to start small.
Las Vegas Review Journal
September 24, 2019
UNLV researchers have been awarded a $700,000 grant to bring a new technology to campus that will enable researchers to study stalagmites in Nevada’s Great Basin National Park, volcanoes in Hawaii and even rocks from Mars.
KNPR News
August 23, 2019
There’s a question out there related to climate change that everyone asks but no one seems to have a good answer for: When will climate change reach the point of no return? Read the news, and timelines range from 18 months to 12 years to 40 years. UNLV geology professor Matt Lachniet explained it is not about an exact drop-dead moment.
Mashable
April 22, 2019
When Americans celebrated the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, the planet's atmosphere was markedly different than it is today. Nearly 50 years ago, scientists measured Earth's levels of carbon dioxide — the planet's most important greenhouse gas — at around 325 parts per million, or ppm.

Articles Featuring Matthew Lachniet

People preparing to cut ribbon on new Fertitta Complex
Campus NewsNovember 1, 2019
A collection of local, national, and international news stories highlighting the people and programs of UNLV.
A photo depicting the exterior of the Science and Engineering Building on UNLV's campus.
Campus NewsSeptember 19, 2019
UNLV received a nearly $700,000 National Science Foundation grant to house ‘multicollector’ device, the first of its kind in Nevada.
Campus NewsJune 26, 2019
A collection of news stories highlighting the people and programs of UNLV.
ResearchNovember 28, 2018
Climate change researcher Matt Lachniet explains the impacts of hotter temperatures.