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The Scientist and Educator: Jeff Eggleston

The research he’s done at UNLV has set Eggleston on a path to addressing movement-related impairments in children with developmental disorders or disabilities.

People  |  May 9, 2018  |  By UNLV News Center
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Jeff Eggleston, '18 Ph.D. Interdisciplinary Health Sciences

Editor's Note: 

Jeff Eggleston is one of the students we're featuring as we celebrate spring 2018 commencement. Join us in congratulating our newest alumni in social media with #UNLVGrad. Full ceremony details on the commencement website.


Inspiration

I've always loved sports, so examining how the body moves from a scientific standpoint seemed like the perfect fit. My research looks at the movement abilities of children with autism. We’re taking some of this unknown information we’ve guessed about for years and quantitatively and objectifying that there are movement disorders associated.

Why UNLV

I chose UNLV because of the reputations of the faculty in our department. They are some of the best scientists, researchers, and educators in our field. Having their guidance was essential for me to achieve my goals.

Challenge

Finding time. I’ve got a great family with two young children. Once I’m home, I’m dad. Once kids go to bed, then I’m back to researcher mode. The nice thing about it is that it humbled me and brought me back down to real life. When you have young kids, you get to play and have fun. Then you can go back to work with a renewed sense and a renewed energy.

Big Goal

Really imparting this interest in science to students. The yearning to continue education and to not be okay with the status quo, and to push the boundaries of research and critical thinking to make our world a better place.

Being a Rebel Means

You’re willing to push the boundaries of what we know — in my research (that’s) what we know about children with autism. To be not okay with the status quo; you don’t follow the trail that’s been set out, you cut your own.