Published: Michael J. Alarid

Michael J. Alarid (History) had his article "Beyond Banditry: The Significance of Everyday Larceny in New Mexican Social History, 1837-65" published in The Western Historical Quarterly, Volume 50, Issue 2, Summer 2019. This article focuses on larceny in New Mexico and argues that petty larceny is a long-overlooked crime that has the potential to provide insight into the everyday lives of people often absent from our historical narratives. Methodologically, the author has transcribed the New Mexican territorial court records into spreadsheets, analyzed larceny trends over time, and synthesized these findings with the preexisting narratives concerning territorial New Mexico. The article introduces new actors into the fabric of New Mexican history and provides greater texture to our understanding of civil disobedience in territorial New Mexico and the Southwest more broadly.

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