In The News: College of Education

Las Vegas Review Journal
May 21, 2021

Danica Hays will become the UNLV College of Education’s permanent dean after filling the job on an interim basis for nine months. The change will take effect July 1, the university announced Thursday.

Las Vegas Sun
May 18, 2021

Last week, readers of the Sun got a treat in being introduced to Adugna “Adu” Siweya, one of the Las Vegas Valley’s outstanding college graduates this spring. Inspirational stories Siweya's make college graduation season a special time in Las Vegas, an annual reminder of the remarkable minds in our community, and the commitment of students to academic achievement.

KTNV-TV: ABC 13
May 10, 2021

Tech and digital jobs are exploding in the United States according to a Brookings Institute Report, and tech giants are expanding into the fields of education and training to develop a qualified workforce to meet the need.

Fast Company
April 29, 2021

Growing up, it was common in my region of the United States to use the word “guys” with the second person plural, as in: “How are you guys?” I didn’t think twice about using it until I learned the history of the word “guy” and considered what it meant when used for groups that included women and nonbinary people.

CNBC
April 6, 2021

A series of CarMax advertisements featuring WNBA superstar Sue Bird, which recently went viral on social media, uses humor and misdirection to elevate female athletes who have faced decades of underrepresentation in media. Bird’s accomplishments on the court put her among the best players to ever play professional basketball.

Deutschlandfunk
April 6, 2021

The list of well-wishers was long and prominent when Kim Ng signed her contract with the Miami Marlins. She was particularly proud of an ex-first lady, a tennis legend and a former presidential candidate.

Fox News
March 31, 2021

Teachers unions had a greater effect on school reopening plans than COVID-19 hospitalizations, a new report examining unions in 250 large, urban school districts found.

Washington Examiner
March 31, 2021

Teachers unions have often demanded lower community spreads of the coronavirus before they are willing to return teachers to the classroom.

KTNV-TV: ABC 13
March 31, 2021

More students, more teachers. Thousands of valley kids will make their return to the classroom next week. For many, it marks the first in-person learning in more than a year. But before that happens, there's a conversation we need to be having with our kids. 13 Action News anchor Tricia Kean picks up some important safety advice from a local expert.

The 74
March 30, 2021

As the Los Angeles Unified School District prepares to reopen elementary schools for the first time in 13 months, recently released court documents show that while the district pushed for more instructional time for students earlier this year, the union successfully bargained for a reduced teacher workday—and a lot more of what it wanted.

K-12DIVE
March 9, 2021

A student in mental health or behavioral crisis can display obvious actions such as punching or screaming. But other mental health struggles can be hidden, including suicidal ideations, depression and anxiety. As more students return to school after long periods of virtual learning, schools need to be prepared to respond strategically to all types of intensive behaviors, say school psychology experts.

The News Republic
March 8, 2021

Last month in Chicago, after months of heated negotiations, the teachers union and Chicago Public Schools emerged with one of the most detailed school reopening agreements in the nation. Brad Marianno, an education policy professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who has been studying these agreements since last spring, called it the most comprehensive he’s seen, citing its inclusion of things like testing protocols, measures that might lead to reclosing schools, and vaccination commitments. Among other things, the union succeeded in negotiating accommodations for hundreds more members at higher risk of Covid-19 complications, or who serve as the primary caregiver for someone at higher risk, than the district had originally agreed to accommodate.