In The News: College of Liberal Arts

Atlas Obscura
October 20, 2020

ACCORDING TO PIERS MITCHELL, A paleopathologist from the University of Cambridge, scientists have been extracting data from ancient human poop for over a century. “In the past, we’ve been able to look at a single coprolite from a single person”—that is to say, a preserved turd—”and study the microbiome of that one individual.” (The microbiome is the complex collection of microbes living in every animal’s digestive tract.) Now, in a newly released paper in Philosophical Transactions B, Mitchell and co-authors Susanna Sabin and Kirsten I. Bos have blown the lid off of single-turd analysis: by analyzing two medieval latrines’ worth of number two.

Larchmont Buzz
October 20, 2020

A pandemic is arguably not the optimal time to make theater, considering theaters are closed and actors can’t come within six feet of each other. Yet there’s some exciting work being done within pandemic parameters. This weekend I took in three remarkable performances developed during these locked-down days, as well as one recorded just prior to it (the riveting What the Constitution Means to Me, now on Amazon Prime)…plus three exhilarating Dodgers games. (Go, Dodgers!)

EurekAlert!
October 20, 2020

The Misophonia Research Fund is pleased to announce the recipients of a new grant seeking to understand misophonia and develop new therapeutic strategies for those living with the condition. Funded research includes:

VIXIC Gaming Compliance
October 20, 2020

It died with barely a whimper two years ago, but a Senate bill calling for federal regulation of sports betting could rise from the grave if Democrats win control of the White House and the Senate in the November 3 elections.

Indy Star
October 19, 2020

It was July 26, 1964. The article on page 26 of The Indianapolis Star’s Sunday newspaper would have been easy to miss.

Newswise
October 16, 2020

A U.S. map peppered with red and blue has become the unofficial logo of the presidential election in recent years. But it hasn’t always been that way, and, like much in politics, it’s a bit more complicated.

Newswise
October 16, 2020

A U.S. map peppered with red and blue has become the unofficial logo of the presidential election in recent years. But it hasn’t always been that way, and, like much in politics, it’s a bit more complicated.

qnotes
October 16, 2020

District 8 Supervisor Rafael Mandelman introduced a resolution to designate the former home of pioneering LGBTQ and civil rights activists Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin as a local historic landmark.

Desert Companion
October 16, 2020

Kenadie Cobbin-Richardson, executive director of West Side redevelopment nonprofit Nevada Partners, and Tyler Parry, UNLV assistant professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies, have ideas about how to fix Southern Nevada’s affordable housing problem. But — and this is a big but — none of them will work, at least not on their own. Like most forms of inequality, the housing injustice that leads people of color and poor and marginalized populations to be segregated in bad neighborhoods with substandard dwellings doesn’t exist in a vacuum; it’s part of a larger complex of oppression. In less than an hour, Cobbin Richardson and Parry touched on education inequity, mass incarceration, public transportation, rent control, student loan debt, and voting rights. And they were just getting started.

NBC News
October 16, 2020

Hadeid Arreola sat at her family’s kitchen table during dinner about a month ago discussing the upcoming election with her parents and three sisters. Voting was important to her family, especially her parents, Mexican immigrants who became U.S. citizens about 25 years ago. They had always stressed its importance to their children.

Las Vegas Sun
October 15, 2020

Las Vegas will host an NCAA Tournament men's basketball regional for the first time after the NCAA changed a policy that prevented states with sports wagering from hosting championships.

Las Vegas Sun
October 15, 2020

Las Vegas will host an NCAA Tournament men's basketball regional for the first time after the NCAA changed a policy that prevented states with sports wagering from hosting championships.