Accomplishments: College of Liberal Arts

January 29, 2020
Kenneth Miller (Political Science) and Tasha Philpot (University of Texas at Austin) recently published "A New Face to the Race Card? Campaigns, Racial Cues, and Candidate Credibility" in Social Science Quarterly where they assess the effects of positive, inclusive racial imagery in campaign advertising. In the study they find that inclusive imagery signals to voters that the candidate is more racially inclusive, but that the impact of using these images is contingent on the candidate's...
January 29, 2020
Andrew Thomas Reyes (Nursing), Christopher Kearney (Psychology), and Ross Bryant (Military and Veteran Services Center) published an article "Student Veterans’ Construction and Enactment of Resilience: A Constructivist Grounded Theory Study" and was considered as a top cited article for 2018-19 in the Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing.  
January 28, 2020
Tirth Bhatta (Sociology) and colleagues published "Intersectional Effects of Gender, Education, and Geographic Region on Functional Health Disparities Among Older Adults in India" in the Journal of Aging and Health.  
January 28, 2020
Jeff Schauer (History) published an invited blog post, "An Ecological Anomaly: Wildlife Policy on the Northern Rhodesian Copperbelt," on the Oxford University-based, European Research Council-funded Comparing the Copperbelt project site. Comparing the Copperbelt combines the efforts of transnational and borderlands scholars of the colonial and national eras to explore the significance of the central African Copperbelt (which spans contemporary Zambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo) to...
January 27, 2020
Austin Horng-En Wang (Political Science) has published the article "Efficiency over Generosity? Evidence of Electoral Accountability from Typhoon Dayoff in Taiwan" in the Asian Journal of Political Science. This article shows that Taiwanese voters will reward the county mayors by votes after they made the correct decision on typhoon dayoffs. Therefore, people can hold the incumbent accountable when the policy outcome can clearly attribute to the incumbent's decision. 
January 24, 2020
Susan Byrne (World Languages and Cultures) served as academic advisor for a critical author entry included in the Gale series Literature Criticism from 1400 to 1800. The entry is for 16th-century Spanish soldier and poet Francisco de Aldana, whose work was highly praised by contemporaries Miguel de Cervantes and Lope de Vega, among others. In 1832, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow translated a few of Aldana's sonnets, and the poet would later come to be seen as a principal motivating force in the...
January 24, 2020
Carlos S. Dimas (History) recently presented his working paper "Science on the Pampas: The Development of the Argentine Meteorological Service and the Formation of the Nation-State" at the annual American Historical Association Conference in New York City. The research for this paper stems from his work as a Residential Fellow at Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, Missouri.
January 24, 2020
Barbara G. Brents (Sociology) along with two UNLV alumnae, Crystal A. Jackson, '03 BA Psychology, '07 MA Sociology, and '13 PhD Sociology, (now of the John Jay School of the City University of New York) and Aleta Baldwin, '06 BA Women's Studies, (now of University of Texas at San Antonio), and Paul Maginn (University of Western Australia) are the authors of an article, "Consent and Sexualized Leisure in Sin City: Observations from a U.S. Pornography Expo in Las Vegas," that recently was...
January 22, 2020
Anne H. Stevens (Interdisciplinary, Gender, and Ethnic Studies), along with alumna Molly C. O'Donnell, '15 PhD English, have co-edited the collection The Microgenre: A Quick Look at Small Culture with Bloomsbury, released this month. Contributors to this collection of essays about highly specific cultural genres include Megan Becker, John Hay (both English), Heather Lusty (Honors), and Susanna Newbury (Art). A book launch celebration is set for 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21, at the Writer's Block...
January 22, 2020
Michelle Tusan (History) is the author of the book, The British Empire and the Armenian Genocide: Humanitarianism and Imperial Politics from Gladstone to Churchill, which now is out in paperback.
January 17, 2020
Iesha Jackson (Teaching & Learning), Doris L. Watson, Tara Plachowski (both Educational Psychology & Higher Education), Marcia Gallo (History), and Claytee White (Oral History Research Center) have been awarded a research grant from the Branch Alliance for Educator Diversity for a study titled, Digging Deep and Branching Out: Using Oral History and Collaborative Inquiry to Explore Candidate Resilience and Craft Equitable Experiences for ARL Teachers of Color. The research will focus on ...
January 16, 2020
Marina Garber-Colacicchi (World Languages and Cultures) received a 2019 Ernest Hemingway Award in the poetry category. The award is issued by The New World literary magazine based in Toronto, Canada.