Brad Donohue In The News

Profile: Brad Donohue

The Ultimate Sports Parent Podcast
October 23, 2019
The pressures of modern youth sports are creating stress related mental health issues in young athletes. But there’s a non-traditional way of addressing this stress. That’s what we learned during our interview with Bradley Donohue, a psychology professor at University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), and director of The Optimum Performance Program in Sports (TOPPS), a mental health program for athletes.
October 3, 2019
An athlete looking to get faster or stronger might spend time in the gym or working on their skills with a coach.
October 3, 2019
An athlete looking to get faster or stronger might spend time in the gym or working on their skills with a coach.
Everyday Health
August 19, 2019
On fields, courts, tracks, and arenas everywhere athletes are pushing the limits of what the human body can do (and what their own bodies can do). The difference between winning and losing may come down to fractions of a second, a single decision to go left rather than right, or the ability to endure just a little bit more.
Authority Magazine
August 9, 2019
I had the pleasure to interview Licensed clinical psychologist Brad Donohue. Brad is a UNLV professor of psychology and director of The Optimum Performance Program in Sports (TOPPS) — a mental health program targeted specifically to college athletes. He also writes a regular column for Psychology Today.
July 8, 2019
A number of bloggers have asked us to discuss sport performance optimization exercises that are supported in science. In answering this call, we’d like to report the results of a study that compared the effectiveness of 3 exercises that were designed to improve running performance (systematic motivational exchanges, yoga, discussion about competitive running), and show how this information can be used to assist athletes immediately prior to competitive events.
April 23, 2019
Imagine that you are a coach. You notice that your team tends to take their strength and conditioning workouts less seriously, when compared to their other training. You want to motivate your athletes to work hard and stay engaged during this training. Would it be better to discuss the negative consequences of not getting stronger? Or focus on the potential benefits of increasing their strength?
March 18, 2019
Aside from a couple play-in wild card games happening tomorrow and Wednesday, the team's are set for this year's NCAA men's basketball tournament. And with 64 teams in the big dance, only one will win, meaning a whopping 63 hopefuls will head home on a loss. So how can players, teams and fans cope with loss when it comes to sports?