Melva Thompson-Robinson In The News

Las Vegas Sun
Considering Las Vegas’ population is 61.88% white and 12.23% Black, the data shows proportionally Black women are more likely to die in pregnancy-related deaths. Nationally about 700 women die each year from pregnancy-related causes, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control, and Black women are 2 to 3 times as likely to die from a pregnancy-related cause than white women.
Verywell Health
Vaccine hesitancy has been prominent in the United States in response to COVID-19, but resistance to vaccination has been presenting public health challenges long before the start of the pandemic.
Verywell Health
As COVID vaccination rates stall, and the Delta variant spreads across the U.S., the Biden administration announced in early July that it will implement several strategies to encourage more people to get vaccinated.
Verywell Mind
Your race and gender can make a big difference in whether you receive treatment for a headache disorder, such as migraine, new research has found.
Healthline
According to a new study, a disproportionate number of Hispanic Americans have died from COVID-19 due to workplace exposure to the coronavirus compared with their non-Hispanic white counterparts.
Web MD
Shortly after Andrew Suggs 32, launched his barbershop booking app Live Chair, his father's health started to decline from congestive heart failure. It led Suggs to research heart disease. That's how he learned that African American people, like his father and himself, were more likely than Americans of any other large racial or ethnic group to die of heart disease.
Verywell Health
An increasing number of higher education institutions are requiring students to get vaccinated against COVID-19 before attending campuses in the fall. Among these are Rutgers University, Cornell University, Duke University, and Brown University.
The Africa Centre
COVID-19 has had a severe and disproportionate impact on the Black community in the U.K, they are twice as likely as white people to catch the virus. Black people are also overly represented in the numbers of those working in the National Health Service (NHS). We can’t afford to ignore the worrying implications.