Joel S. Snyder

Associate Professor of Psychology
Director, Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory
Expertise: Cognition, Perception, Auditory Processing, Cognitive Neuroscience

Biography

Joel Snyder is an expert in auditory, music, and visual perception and cognition. His research examines how listeners perceive objects and changes in complex environments, such as a crowded room or a forest filled with animals. He also studies how normal aging and mental illness affects perception.

His work has been published in numerous academic publications including, Psychological Research, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Developmental Psychology, and Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Snyder also directs the Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at UNLV.

Education

  • Ph.D., Psychology, Cornell University
  • B.A., Psychology, University of California San Diego

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psychology & human behavior

Joel S. Snyder In The News

Houston Chronicle
February 7, 2020
Nearly 80 years after the first casino blinked to life along the stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard now known as the Strip, the re-illumination of Las Vegas is nearly complete.
Texarkana Gazette
February 6, 2020
Nearly 80 years after the first casino blinked to life along the stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard now known as the Strip, the re-illumination of Las Vegas is nearly complete. Call it the end of the neon era or the beginning of the LED epoch.
Los Angeles Times
January 28, 2020
Nearly 80 years after the first casino blinked to life along the stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard now known as the Strip, the re-illumination of Las Vegas is nearly complete.
Las Vegas Review Journal
January 3, 2019
Four days, 11 venues, more than 180,000 attendees.

Articles Featuring Joel S. Snyder

Campus NewsFebruary 18, 2020
A collection of news stories capturing the excitement and accomplishments of UNLV at the start of a new decade.
child plays guitar hero guitar
ResearchFebruary 9, 2016
UNLV study finds people who frequently play music video games outperform non-musicians on music perception tests.