Jef Jaeger

Associate Professor in Residence, School of Life Sciences
Expertise: Conservation biology, Phylogeography, Desert wildlife, Ecology, Population biology , Climate change

Biography

Life sciences professor Jef Jaeger specializes in conservation biology, ecology, population biology, and phylogeography. In addition to research, his passions include teaching biological sciences to undergraduate students who are pursuing degrees outside of sciences.

Since 1991, Jaeger has published over 25 publications highlighting desert wildlife — including bighorn sheep, amphibians, and more — and climate change indicators in the American West. Jaegar's publications have been recognized by publications including Frontiers of Ecology and Evolution and ScienceDaily.

Jaeger has received numerous fellowships and awards throughout his career at UNLV, including the College of Sciences' Outstanding Dissertation for 2006 and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Network For Environmental Management Studies (NEMS) Fellowship.

Education

  • Ph.D., Biological Sciences, UNLV
  • M.S., Biological Sciences, UNLV
  • B.A., Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

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biology, environment, science & technology

Jef Jaeger In The News

August 27, 2020
In the American Southwest, native desert bighorn sheep populations found in landscapes with minimal human disturbance, including several national parks, are less likely to be vulnerable to climate change, according to a new study led by Oregon State University.
August 26, 2020
In the American Southwest, native desert bighorn sheep populations found in landscapes with minimal human disturbance, including several national parks, are less likely to be vulnerable to climate change, according to a new study led by Oregon State University.
March 23, 2012
Even in places as seemly well-studied as the national parks of North America, new species are still being discovered. Using ultraviolet light that cause scorpions to fluoresce a ghostly glow, researchers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) have discovered an intriguing new scorpion in Death Valley National Park. They named the species Wernerius inyoensis, after the Inyo Mountains where it was found. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Articles Featuring Jef Jaeger

A man walks through weeds
Research | October 29, 2019
UNLV’s reintroduction effort keeps leopard frog species off the endangered list.
Research | May 8, 2012
A new species of scorpions nearly squirmed past a couple of UNLV graduate students. The story behind the Death Valley arthropod's discovery.