Jason Steffen

Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy
Expertise: Astronomy, Exoplanets, Cosmology, Dark matter and energy, Gravitation, General physics

Biography

Jason Steffen works in the field of exoplanets — planets that orbit distant stars. He has been a member of the science team for NASA's Kepler mission.  He continues to analyze data from that mission to understand the properties of planets and planetary systems. He also worked on projects related to dark matter, dark energy, and gravity.

Steffen is originally from Utah and attended graduate school in Seattle. Before coming to UNLV, he was the Lindheimer Fellow at Northwestern University and the Brinson Fellow at Fermilab outside of Chicago.

In addition to his work in astrophysics, he is known for the Steffen Method, a procedure to efficiently board passengers on an airplane.

Education

  • PhD in Physics, University of Washington, Seattle
  • BS in Physics and Mathematic, Weber State University

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Jason Steffen In The News

Las Vegas Review Journal
February 12, 2020
You have to feel for the little fella. Pluto doesn’t have the bling of Saturn’s rings. It lacks the famed little green men of Mars. It certainly isn’t as much fun to say as Uranus.
WGN Radio 720
February 10, 2020
Jason Steffen, professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas joins The Matt Bubala Show to discuss all things airplanes, updates on the Kepler Mission and future projects. Tune in to the full conversation here.
Quartz
January 17, 2020
No one enjoys boarding an airplane. It’s slow, it’s inefficient, and often undignified. And that’s without even getting into the ethical quandary of so-called gate lice, the anxious passengers who cluster at the gate before their group is called. But at least one part of the process doesn’t need to be disrupted. When it comes to shunting slow-moving passengers to the front of the queue, such as those requiring assistance or with small children, the airlines have it exactly right.
Daily Mail
January 16, 2020
A team of researchers led from Norway used space-time geometry techniques to explore the factors that lead to a speedy take-off or an agonising delay on the tarmac.

Articles Featuring Jason Steffen

UNLV professor Matthew Lachniet works in his lab on campus.
PeopleDecember 27, 2019
A collection of stories highlighting UNLV faculty and students who made the news in 2019.
People preparing to cut ribbon on new Fertitta Complex
Campus NewsNovember 1, 2019
A collection of local, national, and international news stories highlighting the people and programs of UNLV.
An image of the Earth depicted as a flat surface.
ResearchMarch 11, 2019
As the Flat Earth Theory gains resurgence with a new Netflix documentary, a UNLV astronomer explains how it fizzles.
petri dish and beakers containing liquids
ResearchDecember 26, 2018
In 2018, faculty and students collaborated with one another and international colleagues on scientific exploration that sought to help people make sense of themselves and the world around them.