Elizabeth Lawrence

Assistant Professor of Sociology
Expertise: Health and Social Inequality, Education, Social Demography, Life Course Theory

Biography

Elizabeth Lawrence is an expert on the trends, causes, and consequences of social inequality, with a particular focus on health disparities by educational attainment. 

Her research examines the social origins of both educational and health inequalities in order to better understand why more educated individuals lead longer and healthier lives. She has also studied the socioeconomic disparities in child health and mortality, social patterns in adolescent vaping, and the educational differences in health behaviors across the transition to adulthood. 

Prior to joining UNLV, Lawrence earned her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder. Most recently, she completed her postdoctoral fellowship in the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Her research has been published in Maternal and Child Health Journal, the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Social Science & Medicine, and Demography, among others.

Education

  • Ph.D., Sociology, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Master of Arts, Sociology, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Bachelor of Arts, Philosophy, University of Notre Dame

Search For Other Experts On

health & medicine, social issues

Elizabeth Lawrence In The News

Las Vegas Review Journal
July 29, 2019
Children whose parents have lower levels of education have a significantly higher risk of dying young, according to a new study by researchers at UNLV.
Science Daily
July 9, 2019
A new study reveals substantially higher risks of death between ages 1-24 for children living in families with lower levels of parental education, lower levels of family income, and/or for those living in a single parent family -- all independent of one another.

Articles Featuring Elizabeth Lawrence

UNLV sign on campus
ResearchJuly 9, 2019
A new study reveals stark disparities in mortality risk among children and youth across several measures of parental socioeconomic status.