Published: Steve Rowland

Steve Rowland (Geoscience) recently published "Early Adaptation to Eolian Sand Dunes by Basal Amniotes is Documented in Two Pennsylvanian Grand Canyon Trackways" in PLOS One. The study confirmed the oldest vertebrate tracks in the Grand Canyon. The two sets of fossilized tracks are approximately 313 million years old and are lying in view on the park's Bright Angel Trail. The tracks are among the oldest tracks on Earth of shelled-egg-laying animals, such as reptiles, and the earliest evidence of vertebrate animals walking in sand dunes.

The original story "Tiny Footprints, Big Discovery: Reptile Tracks Oldest Ever Found in Grand Canyon" was written after the tracks were discovered and Rowland presented the findings at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology's annual meeting, but before being published in PLOS One

People in the News

a close-up of demetria bonner in front of plants
People | December 3, 2020
This administrative assistant says the opportunity to help others inspires her.
woman in suit tossing softball
People | December 2, 2020
Through community outreach, UNLV's Becky Pugh helps high school students better understand their path to college.
Portrait of woman seated outdoors
People | November 30, 2020
After trying a variety of jobs, Karintha Fenley finally found her "perfect fit" in academic advising.