In The News: Division of Health Sciences

Fox News
February 27, 2020

If you have an expensive car, you’re probably less likely to stop for pedestrians, a new study has found.

Yahoo!
February 27, 2020

If you have an expensive car, you’re probably less likely to stop for pedestrians, a new study has found.

Consumer Affairs
February 27, 2020

Imagine that you’re driving down the street and you’re coming up on a crosswalk. The street lights are beginning to change and a person is getting ready to cross the street; do you speed up and try to make it through before getting stuck or slow down and give them the right of way?

Psych Org
February 27, 2020

Flashing crosswalk lights are no match for flashy cars, according to a new UNLV study which found that drivers of expensive cars are least likely to stop for crossing pedestrians.

The London Economic
February 27, 2020

Drivers of expensive cars are the least likely to stop for crossing pedestrians, according to a new study.

Science Blog
February 27, 2020

Flashing crosswalk lights are no match for flashy cars, according to a new UNLV study which found that drivers of expensive cars are least likely to stop for crossing pedestrians.

Science Daily
February 27, 2020

Drivers on a whole aren't all that great at stopping for pedestrians waiting at crosswalks: Of 461 cars that researchers examined, only 28 percent yielded. But the cost of the car was a significant predictor of driver yielding, with the odds that they'll stop decreasing by 3 percent per $1,000 increase in the car's value. Researchers estimated the cost of each car using pricing categories from Kelley Blue Book.

EurekAlert!
February 27, 2020

Flashing crosswalk lights are no match for flashy cars, according to a new UNLV study which found that drivers of expensive cars are least likely to stop for crossing pedestrians.

MINNPOST
February 27, 2020

Drivers of expensive cars are less likely to stop for pedestrians in crosswalks than people driving lower-priced cars, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Transport & Health.

CBS Sacramento
February 27, 2020

The science is looking pretty unanimous on this one: Drivers of expensive cars are the worst.

PROMOTOR
February 27, 2020

Researchers have tracked hundreds of cars at pedestrian crossings in the United States, where the law forces drivers to stop. Thus, they found that the likelihood of those driving cheaper cars to stop to allow pedestrians to cross is higher than for expensive cars. On average, the value of cars that stop at pedestrian crossings is $ 5,900, while the average value of those who have not stopped rises to $ 8,000.

Delfi
February 27, 2020

American researchers have tracked a large number of pedestrian crossings in the US, where legislation requires drivers to stop for people who want to cross the crossing. They found that drivers of cheaper cars are more likely to obey this law compared to those who sit in more expensive cars.