In The News: School of Dental Medicine

PR Newswire
December 20, 2017

Absolute Dental has committed to a $100,000 donation and voluntary clinical time over the next five years to the UNLV Absolute Dental Saturday Morning Children's Clinic. This donation and long-term partnership will help improve access to quality dental care to underserved children in the Las Vegas community.

The Stem Cell Podcast
November 15, 2017

A team of researchers from the University of Nevada Las Vegas have developed a device they hilarious call the “Tooth Cracker 5000” to extract 80 percent of the stem cells a pulp contains from a wisdom tooth.

KTNV-TV: ABC 13
October 31, 2017

Little ghouls and goblins will soon be wandering all around the valley in search of candy. But the real monster may be lurking in your child's mouth. Contact 13 looks at the 3 types of candies to stay away from.

KVVU-TV: Fox 5
October 24, 2017

FOX5's Alyssa Deitsch shares a recommendation from a University of Nevada, Las Vegas dentist for Halloween.

KTNV-TV: ABC 13
October 12, 2017

Young children in Headstart or Early Headstart programs may be getting a visit from the dentist, at no cost to parents. For many kids, it could be their first time seeing a dentist.

Digital Trends
October 11, 2017

Stem cells are a crucial part of modern medicine and can be used to treat a wide variety of medical conditions. Now researchers at University of Nevada, Las Vegas have discovered a new way of harvesting these all-important biological cells by (get ready to wince!) extracting them from the root pulp inside every tooth.

Geek
October 9, 2017

Researchers at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas are on the cuspid of making scientific history.

engadget
October 9, 2017

That pesky wisdom tooth you're glad you got rid of is apparently a great source of stem cells that could save lives. However, it's not easy getting to the tooth root pulp that contains those cells: drilling into the tooth generates damaging heat that lowers the number of cells that can be harvested. In addition, the water used to rinse the tooth could have corrosive elements and the enamel particulates from the drilling could contaminate the pulp. To solve that issue, a team of researchers from the University of Nevada Las Vegas have developed a device they hilarious call the "Tooth Cracker 5000" to extract 80 percent of the stem cells a pulp contains.

Dentistry Today
October 6, 2017

Stem cells have the potential to revolutionize treatment for a wide array of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, though harvesting enough of them for beneficial use and keeping them viable until they are needed presents significant challenges. So, researchers at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), have developed an efficient technique for taking these cells from a common source—wisdom teeth.

Futurism
October 5, 2017

A collaboration of dentists and engineers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) made a discovery that could potentially revolutionize how and where we harvest, preserve, and use stem cells. In a study published in Biomaterials and Biomechanics in Bioengineering, the team led by UNLV biomedical sciences professor Karl Kingsley and advanced education program in orthodontics director James Mah turned to root pulps in teeth, specifically wisdom teeth, as an abundant source of stem cells.

News Medical
October 5, 2017

Stem cells. Few research discoveries hold as much promise of single-handedly expanding medical treatment options as they do. Miraculously able to act as transformers either re-creating or morphing into a variety of cell types found within the organisms they originate from stem cells offer humanity hope for new, more effective therapies against a number of chronic and terminal diseases. And finding them is surprisingly easy.

Phys.org
October 5, 2017

Stem cells. Few research discoveries hold as much promise of single-handedly expanding medical treatment options as they do. Miraculously able to act as transformers—either re-creating or morphing into a variety of cell types found within the organisms they originate from—stem cells offer humanity hope for new, more effective therapies against a number of chronic and terminal diseases. And finding them is surprisingly easy.