Accomplishments: Department of History

June 17, 2019
William Bauer (History and American Indian Alliance) presented a paper, "Not Dammed Indians: The Dos Rios Dam, the Round Valley Reservation and the History of Indian Removal" at the Historians of the Twentieth Century United States annual conference at John Moores University in Liverpool, England. He discussed how, in the late 1960s, American Indians on Northern California's Round Valley Reservation defeated an effort to build a dam and flood their reservation. 
May 21, 2019
Michael Green (History) published the essay "Eastern and Western Empire: Thaddeus Stevens and the Greater Reconstruction," in The Worlds of James Buchanan and Thaddeus Stevens: Place, Personality, and Politics in the Civil War Era, edited by Michael J. Birkner, Randall M. Miller, and John W. Quist.
April 30, 2019
William Bauer (History and American Indian Alliance) presented the paper "American Indian Freedom, Sovereignty and United States Capitalism," at the 40th annual American Indian Workshop in Poznan, Poland, earlier this month. He discussed how ideas regarding freedom and sovereignty supported the federal Indian policy of allotment and continue to be used to support policies that seek to privatize American Indian land and resources.
April 29, 2019
Michael J. Alarid (History) had his article "Beyond Banditry: The Significance of Everyday Larceny in New Mexican Social History, 1837-65" published in The Western Historical Quarterly, Volume 50, Issue 2, Summer 2019. This article focuses on larceny in New Mexico and argues that petty larceny is a long-overlooked crime that has the potential to provide insight into the everyday lives of people often absent from our historical narratives. Methodologically, the author has transcribed the New...
April 15, 2019
Carlos S. Dimas (History) has been awarded a Residential Fellowship at the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, Missouri, the world’s foremost independent research library devoted to science, engineering, and technology While there, he will research his new project A Nation of Climates: Agriculture, Climatology, and Nation-Building in the Argentine Patagonia, 1865-1950. The project examines the development of meteorology and its role in the formation of the Argentine nation-state.
April 8, 2019
Michael J. Alarid (History) presented, "Strongmen in the Northern Borderlands: Reconsidering Landholding New Mexicans in the Mexican State and American Territorial Periods, 1836-63" at the 66th annual meeting of the Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies in Oaxaca, Mexico, last month.
April 3, 2019
Michael J. Alarid (History) published a book review of Porous Borders: Multiracial Migrations and the Law in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. The book is part of The David J. Weber Series in the New Borderlands History. Alarid's review appears in the spring 2019 edition of the Western Historical Quarterly.
March 26, 2019
Michelle Tusan (History) won the Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies' biannual article prize for "Genocide, Famine and Refugees on Film: Humanitarianism and the First World War," which was published in the academic journal Past and Present.
March 6, 2019
Sheila Bock (Interdisciplinary, Gender, and Ethnic Studies) and Miriam Melton-Villanueva (History) published an article, “Collaboration, Women’s Work, and the Unfinished Story of a Sonoran Tale Collection,” in the Journal of American Folklore. This article considers a body of research materials from an unfinished dissertation project, specifically a collection of Sonoran folktales documented by UCLA graduate student Ronald B. Melton and his wife, Lily Villanueva Melton, in the 1970s. The...
January 29, 2019
Jeff Schauer (History) published Wildlife between Empire and Nation in Twentieth Century Africa with Palgrave Macmillan. This book recounts the emergence of wildlife policy in eastern and central Africa against the backdrop of colonial conquest, the consolidation of colonial rule, the process of decolonization, and the period of national states. It puts five core themes at the heart of this fraught and contested narrative: changing administrative forms, militarization, nationalism, science, and...
January 9, 2019
William Bauer (History and American Indian Alliance) presented a paper, "Not Dammed Indians: The Dos Rios Dam and the Politics of Indian Removal in the 1960s," at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association, in Chicago in January.
November 26, 2018
Michael J. Alarid (History) presented "Beyond Banditry: Everyday Larceny in Territorial New Mexico" at the Zimmerman Library on the campus of the University of New Mexico earlier this month. His invited talk was part of the fall 2018 People and Places series at the University Libraries Center for Southwest Research & Special Collections.