Brian Hedlund In The News

Profile: Brian Hedlund

NDTV Food
February 14, 2020
Want to lose some weight? Opt for low carb and high protein diet! This is the go-to suggestion every second person advises. But did you know this may lead to alleviation of hospital-acquired infections? A recent study says so.
Medindia
February 14, 2020
Diet low in carbohydrates, high in fat and protein can be good for the waistline, but new study shows that just the opposite may help to reduce the hospital-acquired infection caused by Clostridioides difficile. The study appears in mSystems, an open access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
Devdiscourse
February 14, 2020
In contrast with the popular opinion that low carb and high protein diets help in maintaining the waistline, a new study suggests that the same may lead to alleviation of hospital-acquired infections. The study surrounding the hospital-acquired infection Clostridioides difficile was published in the journal mSystems.
February 12, 2020
Popular diets low in carbs and high in fat and protein might be good for the waistline, but a new UNLV study shows that just the opposite may help to alleviate the hospital-acquired infection Clostridioides difficile.
February 12, 2020
In a new study published this week in mSystems, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers report that mice fed a high-protein, high-fat diet were more likely to acquire a deadly C. difficile infection than mice eating a standard diet. Their findings also suggest that a diet high in carbohydrates protects against infection.
EurekAlert!
February 12, 2020
Diets like the Keto, Paleo and Atkins focus on high-fat, high-protein meals that are often low in carbohydrates. This mix may appeal to Clostridioides difficile bacteria, too.
The Medical News
February 12, 2020
Diets like the Keto, Paleo and Atkins focus on high-fat, high-protein meals that are often low in carbohydrates. This mix may appeal to Clostridioides difficile bacteria, too.
November 14, 2018
Brian Hedlund and Ariel Friel collect microbes living for tens of thousands of years in the subsurface of the earth. By studying these microorganisms, they hope to gain clues about potential life on Mars and other planets.