Tamara D. Herold

Associate Professor, Criminal Justice
Director, Crowd Management Research Council
Associate Director, Center for Crime and Justice Policy
Graduate Director
Expertise: Place-based crime prevention, Crowd dynamics and violence

Biography

Tamara D. Herold received her Ph.D. in criminal justice from the University of Cincinnati. She uses the crime science perspective to study the criminogenic impact of the design and management of places, as well as crowd dynamics that lead to violence. Her research and teaching projects involve working directly with police, private security, and stadium/venue operators. She has authored numerous scholarly articles, books, technical reports, and problem-oriented policing guides sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Herold co-developed the nationally recognized violence reduction strategy P.I.V.O.T. (Place-based Investigations of Violent Offender Territories). P.I.V.O.T. is designed to stop shootings in chronically violent urban locations. Police, city departments, and local communities work together to disrupt opportunities for violence, using a problem-oriented approach that focuses on uncovering and dismantling place-networks that permit violent activities. In 2017, P.I.V.O.T. was awarded the international Herman Goldstein Award for Excellence in Problem-Oriented Policing. 

A Teaching and Learning Center Fellow at UNLV, Herold has been the recipient of the CSUN Faculty Excellence Award, the College of Urban Affairs Teaching Award, and UNLV’s Spanos Distinguished Teaching Award.

Education

  • Ph.D., Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati

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crime & criminal justice, environment

Tamara D. Herold In The News

Idaho Press
August 1, 2020
The Boise Police Department currently doesn’t have a set policy governing how it responds to civil disturbances and protests.
The Courier-Journal
July 24, 2020
Louisville's newly formed Place-Based Investigations unit was thrust into the spotlight this month after a lawsuit filed in the Breonna Taylor shooting labeled it a "rogue police unit" formed to target people and homes on Elliott Avenue.
Las Vegas Review Journal
July 10, 2020
As the coronavirus pandemic forced more people than ever to stay home this year, experts feared a rise in domestic-related homicides would follow.
Wall Street Journal
June 15, 2020
At least 20 people have suffered traumatic eye injuries after being hit by rubber bullets and other projectiles during recent demonstrations over the killing of George Floyd, according to a leading medical group, prompting calls for a ban on their use by police for crowd control.

Articles Featuring Tamara D. Herold

A UNLV banner on campus.
Campus NewsJuly 2, 2020
A collection of news stories featuring the people and programs of UNLV.
man posing near video cameras
ResearchDecember 4, 2019
Graduate student Wenrong Wang harnesses his gaming knowledge to lead an interdisciplinary study on the use of facial recognition.
Tamara Madensen outside T-Mobile Arena.
ResearchDecember 21, 2017
UNLV professor uses crime science to head off chaos in public spaces.