Austin Horng-En Wang

Assistant Professor of Political Science
Expertise: Asia Politics, Taiwan Politics, Taiwan-China-US relationship, Public Opinion and Election

Biography

Austin Horng-En Wang is an expert on voting behavior, East Asian politics, and political psychology. His dissertation examined the relationship between temporal discounting and political participation through survey and experiments in the U.S., Taiwan, and Ukraine. His current research explores the long-term effect of political repression and attitude toward war in East Asia.

Wang’s commentary on Asian politics have appeared in The Washington Post, The National Interest, and Huffington Post, among others. His research has been published in highly respected journals, including Political Research Quarterly, Electoral Studies, Asian Survey, and Social Science Research.

Education

  • Ph.D., Political Science, Duke University
  • M.A., Political Science, National Taiwan University
  • B.S., Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University

Search For Other Experts On

politics (international), politics (national)

Austin Horng-En Wang In The News

Bloomberg
September 11, 2019
Heading into 2019, Tsai Ing-wen looked at risk of becoming Taiwan’s first one-term president. Then came the unrest in Hong Kong.
The Atlantic
August 26, 2019
The ongoing protests in Hong Kong have captivated the world, prompting speculation of another brutal Tiananmen-like government crackdown. Rather than viewing Hong Kong merely through the lens of a China problem, however, it may make more sense to see it in the context of the broader Asia-Pacific region.
The Atlantic
August 26, 2019
The ongoing protests in Hong Kong have captivated the world, prompting speculation of another brutal Tiananmen-like government crackdown. Rather than viewing Hong Kong merely through the lens of a China problem, however, it may make more sense to see it in the context of the broader Asia-Pacific region.
New York Times
July 15, 2019
A populist mayor in Taiwan who favors closer ties with China won the opposition party’s nomination to run against President Tsai Ing-wen, who has been sharply critical of Beijing’s attempts to pressure the island into unification.