Minority-Serving Institution

UNLV prides itself on being an institution of opportunity where students traditionally underrepresented in higher education can receive the support they need to achieve their educational and professional goals. As a Minority-Serving Institution (MSI), UNLV enrolls a high percentage of minority students and is committed to reducing barriers to their academic success. UNLV’s MSI Task Force provides leadership and support to the campus community to provide educational equity.

What is MSI and HSI?

Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) and Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) are U.S. colleges and universities that enroll a high percentage of minority students. Because minority populations have experienced disproportionate barriers to higher education, the federal government provides financial support through various titles of the Higher Education Act.

MSI institutions under the Title III eligibility designation include Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution (AANAPISI), Tribal Colleges and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU).

HSI institutions under Title V eligibility include institutions that serve high percentages of Hispanic Americans and other underrepresented populations.

MSI Opportunities MSI Task Force MSI -Student Services Committee

UNLV Designated MSI and HSI

UNLV embraces and promotes the diversity of its students and has demonstrated its commitment and support through its comprehensive academic and campus life programs and initiatives. The federal Minority-Serving Institution (MSI) and Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) designations affirm this work and entitle the university to compete for grants under Title III and Title V of the federal Higher Education Act.

UNLV Designated: Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution (AANAPISI) Title III

 An Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution (AANAPISI) is an institution of higher education that is eligible under section 312(b) of the Higher Education Act and at the time of application, have an enrollment of undergraduate students who are Asian American or Native American Pacific Islander that is not less than 10%.

AANAPISI Program

The purpose the AANAPISI program is to: “Provide grants and related assistance to AANAPISI serving institutions to enable such institutions to improve and expand their capacity to serve Asian American and Native Americans Pacific Islanders and low-income students” (84.031L; 84.382B)

As an AANAPISI, UNLV aims to increase retention, persistence, and completion rates and to expand its capacity to offer web-based undergraduate courses in computer science. Key services include academic tutoring; counseling (i.e., academic, undergraduate financial aid, career, and graduate/professional school admissions and financial aid); frequent, ongoing academic-progress monitoring; and financial-literacy instruction.

In 2013, UNLV became an eligible Title III institution by the Department of Education. UNLV was awarded Nevada’s first Title III grant in 2015 (AANAPISI Part A). UNLV received a second grant (AANAPISI Part F) in 2016. In 2020, UNLV received its third Title III AANAPISI Part A grant that will serve more than 1,000 UNLV students (low-income, first-generation, and those who need academic support) over the five-year grant period. 

The Center provides information about UNLV services and assistance for eligible students under the Title III grant.

UNLV Designated: Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) Title V

The Higher Education Act, 20 USCA Section 1101a, defines a Hispanic-Serving Institution as an institution of higher education that is an eligible institution under Title V of the Department of Education; at the time of application, has an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25% Hispanic; and provides assurances that not less than 50% of its Hispanic students are low-income individuals.

HSI Program

The purpose the HSI program is to “Expand and enhance the academic offerings, program quality, and institutional stability of college and universities that are educating the majority of Hispanic college students and helping large numbers of Hispanic students and other low-income individuals complete postsecondary degrees” (20 U.S. Code, 1101a, n.d) 

UNLV’s goal as an HSI is to increase retention, persistence, and completion rates and to expand the university’s capacity to offer web-based undergraduate courses in computer science. Key services include academic tutoring; counseling (i.e., academic, undergraduate financial aid, career, and graduate/professional school admissions and financial aid); frequent, ongoing academic-progress monitoring; and financial-literacy instruction.

UNLV Statistics

About 63 percent of UNLV students identify as a racial or ethnic minority. Of that, Hispanic students make up the largest minority undergraduate student group at UNLV at 28.8 percent.

UNLV Institutional Organization Memberships

American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education

The American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) is an agent of change for improving education, thus enabling Hispanic students to fully participate in a diverse society. AAHHE works collaboratively with all sectors of education, business, industry, as well as community and professional organizations to enhance the educational aspirations and to meet the needs of a significantly increasing Hispanic population.

AAHHE is committed to:

  • Addressing societal issues as they pertain to the growing population.
  • Convening public discourse focused forums to develop public policy reflecting the changing demographics of our nation.
  • Preparing more Hispanics to pursue a career in higher education as faculty, administrators and policy makers.

Excelencia in Education

Excelencia in Education, founded in 2004, accelerates Latino student success in higher education to address the U.S. economy’s need for a highly educated workforce and for civic leadership by:

  • providing data-driven analysis of the educational status of Latinos;
  • promoting education policies and institutional practices that support their academic achievement; and
  • organizing a network of professionals with common cause for Latino student success. 

Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) was established in 1986 with a founding membership of eighteen institutions. Because of HACU’s exemplary leadership on behalf of the nation’s youngest and fastest-growing population, the Association rapidly grew in numbers and national impact.

Today, HACU represents more than 500 colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the U.S., Puerto Rico, Latin America, Spain and U.S. School Districts. Although our member institutions in the U.S. represent only 17% of all higher education institutions nationwide, together they are home to two-thirds of all Hispanic college students. HACU is the only national educational association that represents Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs).

HACU fulfills its mission by:

  • promoting the development of member colleges and universities;
  • improving access to and the quality of post-secondary educational opportunities for Hispanic students; and
  • meeting the needs of business, industry and government through the development and sharing of resources, information and expertise.

Conferences

HACU's Capitol Forum Event

Each spring, advocates for higher education success convene to shape and promote an agenda for Congress and the country at HACU’s Annual Capitol Forum on Hispanic Higher Education. The 2021 Capital Forum will be held as a virtual event. 

Key to these strategic forums are meetings with congressional offices, which allow leaders in the Hispanic higher education community to speak with their representatives. 

The event brings together leaders of colleges and universities, public policymakers, key federal agency leaders, allied organizations, corporate, community and philanthropic representatives at what has become a powerful national platform for winning public- and private-sector support for Hispanic-Serving Institutions.

AAHHE Program

The American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) is an agent of change for improving education, thus enabling Hispanic students to fully participate in a diverse society. AAHHE works collaboratively with all sectors of education, business, industry, as well as community and professional organizations to enhance the educational aspirations and to meet the needs of a significantly increasing Hispanic population.

MSI Task Force

The MSI Task Force (includes HSI and AANAPISI initiatives) provides institutional leadership and support for establishing UNLV as a leading MSI. The task force includes representatives from various administrative and academic units across the campus and is responsible for organizing a variety of programs and initiatives to support students and faculty of color as well as others underrepresented in higher education.

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