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Center for Crime and Justice Policy News

Current Crime and Justice Policy News

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Campus News | July 2, 2020

A collection of news stories featuring the people and programs of UNLV.

Protest signs read "Defund Police" and "Abolish Police"
Research | June 10, 2020

As more municipalities weigh the future of their police departments, UNLV professors explain what these movements mean and how they would work.

woman in red dress in crowd
People | June 18, 2019

Triple-major Martha Amaya’s research explores the interactions between policing, public policy, and crowd science.

two people with clipboard talking a man
Research | September 26, 2018

Criminal justice students gather public opinion on law enforcement use of drones and body-worn cameras before and after the Oct. 1 shooting.

Melissa Rorie at a gaming table.
Research | February 26, 2018

Criminal justice professor Melissa Rorie digs into the relationship between Nevada's casinos and its gaming regulators.

Tamara Madensen outside T-Mobile Arena.
Research | December 21, 2017

UNLV professor uses crime science to head off chaos in public spaces.

Crime and Justice Policy In The News

KTNV-TV: ABC 13
October 1, 2020

For three years the official death toll of the 1 October mass shooting in Las Vegas was 58. And two survivors who passed away later from complications directly related to their injuries in the incident were not initially added to that count until Thursday.

New York Post
August 4, 2020

Many advocates of “defunding the police” contend that too many police encounters with civilians concern trivial matters. Defunding proponents worry that poor decisions by officers can escalate tensions and lead to unnecessary uses of force. They argue that the police mandate should be more narrowly focused on responding to “serious” crimes, especially violent felonies. All other matters should not be considered police business. This premise has gained a receptive hearing in our political climate. Most people instinctively support the idea of leaving management of serious felonies to the police, who are certainly less likely to get into trouble if their job is simply to arrest violent felons.

City Journal
July 30, 2020

Many advocates of “defunding the police” contend that too many police encounters with civilians concern trivial matters. Defunding proponents worry that poor decisions by officers can escalate tensions and lead to unnecessary uses of force. They argue that the police mandate should be more narrowly focused on responding to “serious” crimes, especially violent felonies. All other matters should not be considered police business. This premise has gained a receptive hearing in our political climate. Most people instinctively support the idea of leaving management of serious felonies to the police, who are certainly less likely to get into trouble if their job is simply to arrest violent felons.

Las Vegas Review Journal
May 18, 2020

This much is clear: Nevada business owners must enforce a rigid set of rules inside their establishments if they want to reopen — or stay reopened — under the governor’s Phase One pandemic economic recovery plan.

KNPR News
September 1, 2019

Before hashtags circulated after the officer-involved death of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, before vigils for Philando Castile, and the marches of Black Lives Matter, police in Suffolk County, New York, killed Kenny Lazo. Among its other ramifications, his 2008 death eventually resulted in the Forced Trajectory Project, or FTP, a media and advocacy organization, now based in Las Vegas, with a website that documents families and communities impacted by police killings.

Las Vegas Sun
July 22, 2019

As traffic safety enforcers and experts try to solve the countywide problem of crashes and fatalities, others are taking a closer look at what makes some Valley roads more dangerous than others and what safety measures can be implemented to reduce deaths.

Crime and Justice Policy Experts

A criminologist with expert knowledge of police order-maintenance practices, police management, and community crime prevention.
An expert in trauma, child abuse, sexual assault, human trafficking, domestic violence, and juvenile delinquency.