In The News: School of Dental Medicine

Dentistry Today
February 18, 2021

The University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Dental Medicine has acquired 60 plastinated human specimens for its head and neck anatomy and neuroscience course. The preserved specimens, which all came from deceased human beings, clearly present the bones, muscles, nerves, and vasculature of the head and neck.

KLAS-TV: 8 News Now
February 1, 2021

DentaQuest, an oral health care company, donated $25,000 to the UNLV School of Dental Medicine to help with their women’s clinic, providing dental work for those in need.

Pissed Consumer
December 23, 2020

This year, we’ve faced COVID-19, a new deadly virus that has changed our lives and brought up many new challenges like lockdowns, social distancing, and mask-wearing. To cope with the ongoing pandemic, scientists all over the world are competing to develop the COVID-19 vaccine that will be safe and effective.

KCBS RADIO
December 21, 2020

As more people wait to get a coronavirus vaccination, others are more skeptical of how it works, and if it works. To talk a little more about the biological aspects of the vaccine, KCBS Radio anchor Dan Mitchinson spoke with Dr. Jeffrey Ebersole, professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Pissed Consumer
December 18, 2020

PissedConsumer interviewed Dr. Jeffrey Ebersole, an immunologist at UNLV, to seek scientific explanation and answers to top COVID-19 vaccine questions: Are these COVID vaccines safe? Moderna VS. Pfizer: which is better? Why speed up vaccination? What are the side effects?

Nevada News Group
December 17, 2020

A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory committee will make recommendations at a hearing on Thursday regarding the approval of one of the two leading vaccines for COVID-19, but in addition to the vaccine’s safety and effectiveness concerns, experts in Nevada are faced with determining how they will get approved doses to the people who need them.

The Millennial Source
December 13, 2020

As COVID-19 cases worldwide surpass 72 million, news of a vaccine has come as a light at the end of the dark tunnel that has been 2020. However, for many analysts, the coronavirus vaccine has raised questions about the future of vaccinations.

The Nevada Independent
December 10, 2020

A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory committee will make recommendations at a hearing on Thursday regarding the approval of one of the two leading vaccines for COVID-19, but in addition to the vaccine’s safety and effectiveness concerns, experts in Nevada are faced with determining how they will get approved doses to the people who need them.

KLAS-TV: 8 News Now
December 9, 2020

The Southern Nevada Health District (SNHD) is preparing to roll out a vaccination campaign once the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are approved.

KNPR News
December 8, 2020

A vaccine for COVID-19 is on everyone’s minds right now. It’s seen as a possible light at the end of what has been a dark tunnel of a year.

Las Vegas Sun
December 7, 2020

UNLV immunologist Jeffrey Ebersole and other experts agree: The COVID-19 vaccines being rolled out across Nevada and the country this month have gone through rigorous testing for safety.

Newswise
December 3, 2020

On November 17, U.S. Sentator Rand Paul of Kentucky compared the effectiveness of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines with "naturally acquired COVID-19" on Twitter. He folllowed-up by asking, "Why does the left accept immune theory when it comes to vaccines, but not when discussing naturally acquired immunity?" Besides ignoring the point of vaccines, which is to protect the public BEFORE they get sick, the comparison of natural COVID-19 infection and vaccine efficacy is inaccurate. Reinfections have not been confirmed and the efficacy of naturally-acquired immunity is still not understood. A person has to survive or suffer through the infection to get protection from naturally acquiring COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises all people, including those who have recovered from COVID-19, to continue to physically distance, wear masks, wash their hands and avoid crowds.