Published: Edward Lynch

Edward Lynch's (Dental) recent paper Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects published in Perspectives in Public Health estimated the concentration of fluoride in drinking water through different zones of 29 districts of Karnataka, India. The research paper presented an updated fluoride concentration intensity map (in relation to temperature and rainfall) and evaluated the data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis, muscle-bone and kidney diseases. The map shows the level of fluoride at a glance, and quickly identifies the fluoride deficit and excess areas of the state. However, Pavagada, which has a high concentration of fluoride in its drinking water, is a concern and needs intervention, like providing treatment, particularly better tertiary care of extreme cases, and establishing primary and secondary prevention of the suffering population. The paper calls for a collaborative approach and support from governmental and non-governmental agencies.

A disturbing fact is that 95 percent of children are suffering from dental fluorosis. Many of the de-fluoridation plants (more than 50 percent) were not working properly. Severe dental fluorois is an indicator of systemic fluorosis, which may affect the kidneys, bones, and muscles. This paper has already been reported in numerous national newspapers and media around the world including four reports in the Times of India, as well as the Deccan Herald and NewsWits.

 

 

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