Information for Students

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Undergraduate Students

Study Abroad

Participating in a study abroad program is a significant and exciting part of completing a university degree. Past students often tell us that their time abroad was the best part of their education. When you study abroad, you take classes at a university in another country. You can study abroad during the summer, during winter break, for a semester, or for the entire academic year. All programs are for credit and financial aid and scholarships are available. Generally speaking, students are not allowed to travel for UNLV related purposes to countries with a State Department Travel Warning.

Countries with Travel Warnings Study Abroad

Getting Started

  • Step 1: Visit or call the Office of International Programs and sign up for one of our daily Study Abroad 101 sessions. Bring the completed Study Abroad Goal Setting Form with you and be sure to check out our study abroad programs before the session.
  • Step 2: After you've attended the Study Abroad 101 session, you're cleared to have a one-to-one meeting with a study abroad advisor. Call for an appointment and bring the completed Program Planning Form with you.
  • Step 3: Apply to a study abroad program. This checklist will help you understand the main tasks to complete before you depart.

National Student Exchange

Undergraduate students can also participate in the National Student Exchange (NSE), which waives out-of-state tuition for students to study for one or two semesters at participating universities in the United States and Canada. All programs are for credit and federal financial aid is available for the U.S. locations.

To learn more about NSE, call to set up an advising appointment with Rhonda Groce, our NSE Coordinator.

National Student Exchange

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Graduate Students

Research Abroad

When graduate students go abroad for academic purposes, it's usually for research. Whether it's for thesis or dissertation research, independent study, or your MFA international requirement, the Office of International Programs can guide you. Funding is available from International Programs for credit-bearing research or study. Also consider applying for nationally competitive scholarships, such as Fulbright (see below).

Getting Started

  • Step 1: Think about where your research will take you. If the State Department has your destination under a travel warning or alert, you will likely need to change your plans.
    Countries with Travel Warnings
  • Step 2: Consult with your graduate advisor. Is it logistically and methodologically feasible for you to conduct your research abroad?
  • Step 3: Make an appointment to meet with an International Programs advisor and submit the International Programs Packet.

Study Abroad

Traditional study abroad is more common at the undergraduate level, but on occasion, some graduate students participate in undergraduate study abroad programs, particularly for intensive language training. Sometimes graduate advisors may be open to allowing grad students to receive graduate credit while studying abroad, but it's rare. Instead, consider scholarship programs for study, such as Fulbright, the Critical Language Scholarship, and the Boren Fellowship (see below). Speak to an advisor at International Programs for more details.

Study Abroad

Nationally Competitive Scholarships

The Office of International Programs Director and Associate Director serve as your campus advisors for scholarships administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE), including the Fulbright US Student Scholarship, the Critical Language Scholarship, and the Boren Fellowship. For more information, call for an advising appointment at 702-895-3896.