Headshot of Jing Nong Liang, PT, Ph.D.

Jing Nong Liang, PT, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department(s): Physical Therapy
Office: BHS 325
Mail Code: 3029
Phone: 702-895-4936
Fax: 702-895-4883
Email: jingnong.liang@unlv.edu

Biography

Assistant professor Jing Nong Liang joined the department of physical therapy during spring 2016 and teaches Neuroplasticity, Directed Research, and Neuroanatomy within the graduate programs.

Dr. Liang’s research focuses on understanding the neuroadaptations following injury or disease, specifically the cortical reorganizations and adapted spinal reflex functions underlying impaired locomotor control among individuals with neurological impairments.  Her long-term objective is to develop a line of targeted neurorehabilitation interventions to address disabilities among patients with movement disorders.

Dr. Liang earned her Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy and Master of Science in Rehabilitation Science from Chang Gung University in Taiwan, and her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Northwestern University in Chicago, IL.

Education:

  • Post-doctoral fellow. Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC.
    Research focus: Stroke neuroplasticity and rehabilitation.
  • PhD. Neuroscience.  Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.
    Dissertation Thesis: Control of foot-forces, muscle activity coordination and H-reflex gain modulation during postural-loaded and non-postural loaded locomotion in individuals post-stroke.
  • M.S. Rehabilitation Science.  Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
    Thesis: Effects of Continuous Passive Motion on Adaptations of Neuromuscular Properties in Individuals with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.
  • B.S. Physical Therapy. Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Courses Taught:

- DPT 798  Directed Research

- DPT 714  Neuroplasticity

- DPT 786  Neurological Rehabilitation

Research Interests:

Dr. Liang's research is primarily focused on understanding the neuroadaptations following injury or disease, specifically the cortical reorganizations and adapted spinal reflex functions underlying impaired locomotor control in individuals with neurological impairments.  Her long-term objective is to develop a line of targeted neurorehabilitation interventions to address disabilities among patients with movement disorders.