Paul Werth, Ph.D.

Chair

Biography

Paul Werth received his B.A. from Knox College (1990) and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan (1996). He has been at UNLV since 1997, and was a fellow at the Slavic Research Center of the University of Hokkaido (Japan) in 2004-05, at the National Humanities Center in 2007-08, and at Center for Advanced Study of Ludwig–Maximilians Universität in 2011.

Since 2009, he has been serving as editor of Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, a leading international journal. He has published articles in Social History, Journal of Modern History, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Slavic Review, Kritika, Russian Review, Nationalities Papers, Ab Imperio, Acta Slavica Iaponica, and Cahiers du monde Russe. His books include At the Margins of Orthodoxy: Mission, Governance, and Confessional Politics in Russia’s Volga-Kama Region (Cornell University Press, 2002); and, Orthodoxy, Non-Orthodoxy, Heterodoxy: Sketches on the History of Religious Diversity in the Russian Empire (Moscow, 2012) [in Russian], and The Tsar's Foreign Faiths: Toleration and the Fate of Religious Freedom in Imperial Russia (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently involved in a project to develop a two-volume history of Asian empires, based at the National University of Singapore. His current and future projects include "Russia's Other Eastern Church", a history of the Armenian confession in the Russian empire; "Religion in Russian Eurasia since 1650", a synthetic, multi-confessional history of Russia's peculiar path to modernity and secularization; and "Russian Sylvania: The Forest in Russian as Terrain, Resource, and Symbol." On most of these projects, he is able to do just about nothing at present because of other duties, so even to list them here borders on false advertising.

Werth's teaching encompasses modern Europe, Russia and Eurasia, religion, the First World War, and International History, with minor and only marginally explicable forays into the United States and Iran.

Expert Areas

  • The Russian Empire, 1760s-1914
  • Problems & practices of imperial rule
  • Religious toleration & freedom of conscience