Barrick Museum

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Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions

Panorama

Opening October 3rd, 6 p.m. through November 26, 2014

The third in a series of traveling exhibits showcasing the recipients of the Nevada Arts Council’s Artist Fellowship Award in the visual arts, "PANORAMA: Selections from the Nevada Arts Council’s Artist Fellowship Program".

The exhibition is a visual sweep, a wide angle view across artistic and geographic terrain. It is a call to viewers to seriously look at the art works in the exhibition and respond.

Participating artists include: Catherine Borg, formerly of Las Vegas, photography; Dean Burton of Reno, photography; Shan Michael Evans of Las Vegas, digital media and animation; Stephen Hendee, formerly of Las Vegas, textiles; Zoltan Janvary of Reno, printmaking and drawing; Robert Morrison of Reno, sculpture; Candace Nicol of Reno, printmaking; Nolan Preece of Reno, chemigram printing; Heather Protz of Las Vegas, photography; Tamara Scronce of Reno, mixed media and sculpture; Christine Siemens, formerly of Las Vegas, photography; and Mary Warner, formerly of Las Vegas, painting.

PANORAMA, an exhibition offered by the Nevada Arts Council, is based on an arts program that is rare in America, the artist fellowship. Here, we are reminded that both the fellowship program and PANORAMA, the touring exhibition that unfolds across Nevada, are exquisite examples of cultural democracy in action.

Braunstein Gallery

Yesterday & Today

October 3–May 30, 2015

Curated by Aurore Giguet "Yesterday & Today" demonstrates a continuum of making by the Southern Paiute and Western Shoshone in southern Nevada. The exhibition features basketry and pottery from the Barrick’s cultural collection as well as objects from the Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas; The Lost City Museum; Nevada Folklife Archives-Nevada Arts Council, and works by contemporary artists Loretta Burden, Fawn Douglas, and Everett Pickyavit.

In this exhibition, objects are looked at as works of a continued vitality, not as archaeological or unearthed anthropological objects. These objects provide a connection to the beliefs and traditions of their makers and owners. They become visible manifestations; they encode, keep, or convey particular types of information that continue to shape the indigenous peoples of Nevada.