In The News: Office of Undergraduate Research

News Medical Life Sciences
December 4, 2017

A groundbreaking study by UNLV researchers shows that taking placenta capsules has little to no effect on postpartum mood, maternal bonding, or fatigue, when compared to a placebo.

Deccan Chronicle
December 4, 2017

A study has recently suggested that new mothers consuming placenta pills, following childbirth, will experience little to no effect on their post-partum mood, maternal bonding or fatigue.

Daily Mail
December 4, 2017

Eating the placenta does not prevent postpartum depression, new research reveals.

American Council on Science and Health
December 4, 2017

Many animals eat their placenta after birth. Zoologists know this is to ward off predators, but when the "natural" birth movement took off in the 1960s, believers stated that if animals do it, it must be for a health reason and humans should also.

Wigan Today
December 4, 2017

The trend of taking placenta capsules after childbirth is growing in popularity in countries such as the UK, France, Germany, Australia and the US.

Sputnik News
December 4, 2017

Ingesting the placenta has become a popular practice among moms, with celebrities like TV personality Kim Kardashian West and actress January Jones claiming that it helps boost energy and deal with postpartum depression.

Asian News International
December 4, 2017

A study has recently suggested that new mothers consuming placenta pills, following childbirth, will experience little to no effect on their post-partum mood, maternal bonding or fatigue.

Romper
December 1, 2017

When you're expecting your first baby, the amount of conflicting information on pregnancy, childbirth, and parenting out there can be overwhelming. Should you breastfeed or use formula? Co-sleep or not? So many choices are fraught with controversy, but there's one decision that's now easier to make than ever, because there's even more evidence that women shouldn't be eating their placentas, in any form. It's true that many other mammals do so, but whether you're blending it into a smoothie or popping freeze-dried pills, placentophagy offers no benefits to humans, and it can actually be extremely dangerous for both mother and child.

Science Mag
December 1, 2017

Celebrity socialite Kim Kardashian West says it boosted her energy level. Mad Men’s January Jones touts it as a cure for postpartum depression. But does eating one’s placenta after birth—an apparently growing practice around the globe—actually confer any health benefits? Not really, according to the first in-depth analyses of the practice.

Las Vegas Review Journal
September 11, 2017

When Amber Turner was about 13, her parents bought her a telescope for Christmas. She’d check out the stars and wonder what was up there.

Las Vegas Sun
September 5, 2017

Amber Turner tried to balance working and going to school full time, but when she passed out in her economics class from exhaustion, she knew it wasn’t possible. “I realized I was lost when I was working at McDonald’s trying to pay my tuition,” Turner said. “I thought: I don’t like what I’m studying enough to be this exhausted. If I’m going to work that much, I want to love what I’m doing.”

Tech Times
June 30, 2017

As influential celebrities like Kim Kardashian and January Jones have done it just like other mammal species, it has become popular for new mothers to eat their placentas after giving birth. Businesses have even capitalized on the trend by offering freeze-dried placenta pills to the market.