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Sand and Bone

Sand and Bone

Go along with a band of UNLV researchers as they uncover the skull of an extinct elephant-like creature that once roamed Esmeralda County.

Research | Apr 7, 2014
  • "The Sump" sits in the shadow of Nevada's highest point, Boundary Peak.
  • Professor Stephen Rowland goes over a map with undergraduate student Andrew Rigney.
  • Visiting professor Joshua Bonde looks over a fossil believed to be the skull of a Gomphothere, which lived 12-16 million years ago.
  • A solution is applied to keep bone fragments in place for transportation.
  • Undergraduate Andrew Rigney works on the fossil under the watchful eye of professor Steve Rowland.
  • From left, visiting professor Joshua Bonde helps undergraduate students Andrew Rigney, Chelsy Salas, and Oscar Vazquez apply a plaster jacket to protect the fossil.
  • Undergraduate student Andrew Rigney picks up "float," or small bones and teeth, as the team searches for more remnants of a time gone by.
  • The team also found teeth from beaver and pieces of camel bone.
  • Graduate student Fabian Hardy.
  • The skull is taken back to camp. It will be further studied at the Las Vegas Natural History Museum.
  • The five-day dig ended each evening around the campfire.
  • Graduate student Fabian Hardy tries his luck with the stars.

Go along with a band of UNLV researchers as they uncover the skull of an extinct elephant-like creature that once roamed Esmeralda County. Photos by Aaron Mayes/UNLV Photo Services. Full story: Photojournal: The Belly of the Sump

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