Alan Simmons In The News

Profile: Alan Simmons

The Vintage News
December 17, 2018
Nine thousand years ago, during the Neolithic period, culture in the PneiHever region of southern Mt. Hebron was undergoing a fundamental shift from being a hunter-gatherer society to an agricultural society.
Inquisitr
December 4, 2018
Archaeologists have recently verified that an eerie stone mask that was unearthed close to the Israeli settlement of Pnei Hever in the West Bank is 9,000 years of age and is a Neolithic relic from a bygone era.
December 4, 2018
With their empty and enigmatic eyes and an apparent smile, the old stone masks of about 9,000 years found in the southern part of the Judean desert are considered a symbol of this region. Furthermore they are extremely rare. There are only 15 known. Therefore when the Israeli Antiquities Authority (IAA) recently announced the discovery of a sixteenth mask, the news immediately attracted both the attention of archaeologists and that of fans. Raising at the same time doubts about the authenticity of these artifacts.
December 3, 2018
With their vacant eyes and enigmatic, toothy expressions, the 9,000-year-old stone masks from the area around the southern Judean desert are among the region’s most compelling and distinctive artifacts. Adding to that is their rarity: Only 15 examples are known to exist. So, when the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) recently announced the discovery of a sixteenth stone mask, it grabbed the attention of archaeologists and the public alike—but also revived a simmering discussion on the authenticity of these unique objects.
November 30, 2018
With their vacant eyes and enigmatic, toothy expressions, the 9,000-year-old stone masks from the area around the southern Judean desert are among the region’s most compelling and distinctive artifacts. Adding to that is their rarity: Only 15 examples are known to exist. So, when the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) recently announced the discovery of a sixteenth stone mask, it grabbed the attention of archaeologists and the public alike—but also revived a simmering discussion on the authenticity of these unique objects.
Science Magazine
May 15, 2018
Odysseus, who voyaged across the wine-dark seas of the Mediterranean in Homer’s epic, may have had some astonishingly ancient forerunners. A decade ago, when excavators claimed to have found stone tools on the Greek island of Crete dating back at least 130,000 years, other archaeologists were stunned—and skeptical. But since then, at that site and others, researchers have quietly built up a convincing case for Stone Age seafarers—and for the even more remarkable possibility that they were Neandertals, the extinct cousins of modern humans.
Daily Mail
May 15, 2018
Modern humans may not have been the first travelers to cross the seas.