Patricia Mulroy In The News

Profile: Patricia Mulroy

The Colorado Sun
April 10, 2019
The diverse, yet unified, politicians from seven states hailing this week’s swift passage of legislation supporting the installation of drought contingency plans to protect the Colorado River have taken the first step in what promises to be a long and painful process.
Voice of San Diego
April 8, 2019
An increasing number of solutions to California and Arizona’s long-term water problems now involve Mexico.
April 4, 2019
At last, members of Congress introduced legislation this week that will enable a seven-state Drought Contingency Plan (DCP) to use less water during shortages. The plan asks the states using the Colorado River to voluntarily cut back on their water use, something Nevada is already doing. The bipartisan bill is sponsored by all the senators that represent Colorado River states.
Arizona Republic
March 29, 2019
Water managers and scientists can’t say with 100 percent certainty what Arizona’s water supply will look like in the distant future. But of all the possible outcomes, one thing seems certain: A water shortage won’t solve itself.
RadioWest
March 22, 2019
In a new book, former manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Pat Mulroy says we’re facing a tough global reality when it comes to water. Growth, urbanization, and the effects of climate change mean we have to find new ways to manage a resource she says most Americans simply take for granted. Mulroy is coming to Utah, and she joins Doug Wednesday to explain what’s at stake, and how creating a shared vision for our water future is more important than ever.
March 7, 2019
Former Southern Nevada Water Authority chief Pat Mulroy is backing an audacious idea she says could free up more Colorado River water and solve a mounting public health and environmental problem in the California desert.
March 5, 2019
Future growth in the Las Vegas Valley will rest almost entirely on the community’s ability to conserve its finite share of the Colorado River, water experts say.
March 4, 2019
After more than three years of talks and repeated threats of federal intervention, water officials in seven Western states still haven’t quite finished an emergency drought plan for the Colorado River.