Simon Gottschalk

Professor, Sociology
Associate, Centre International de Recherche sur l'Individu et la Société Hypermodernes (Paris)
Expertise: Computer-mediated communication, internet studies, Social psychology, Sociology of mental disorders, Environmental sociology, Popular culture and mass media

Biography

For the past several years, Gottschalk's work has revolved around the social and psychological effects of our increasingly online lives in areas such as work, education, family life, cognitive and emotional aptitudes, interactions, our sense of self, etc. He has been interviewed extensively by the local media, and is cited in CNet, the New York Times and the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project.

He is a former president of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction and former editor of its flagship journal Symbolic Interaction. He also is an associate at the Paris-based Research Center on Hypermodern Individuals and Societies.

Gottschalk is the co-author of The Senses in Self, Society, and Culture (Routledge), and the author of many book chapters and articles that provide a critical social psychological approach to topics such as computer-mediated communication, hypermodern theory, mass media, popular culture, terrorism, mental disorders, youth cultures, and others. 

Simon Gottschalk In The News

Newswise
May 22, 2020
As uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic quarantine wears on, there remains one constant: a reliance on the internet, social media, and streaming services for work, school, entertainment, and keeping in touch with friends and family.
IMAGE
April 24, 2020
Having weeks stretched out ahead of me to do nothing but read books, watch films, write with music in the background – it's everything I thought I ever wanted. Prior to lockdown, this was a dream scenario. I'm sociable, I love the company of others, but equally, I'm more than happy with my own company – with long periods of time spent alone.
KNPR News
October 28, 2019
UNR was thrust into an uncomfortable spotlight in 2017 when one of its students was photographed at the violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protestor was killed and several more injured when a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd.
KUER
October 22, 2019
With white supremacist violence on the rise nationwide, a University of Nevada, Las Vegas sociologist is studying how the Internet can turn hateful feelings into deadly actions.

Articles Featuring Simon Gottschalk

cartoon person looks away from phone and touches head anxiously
Business and CommunityMay 22, 2020
UNLV sociologist Simon Gottschalk provides tips on how to adjust to increased screen time during the coronavirus pandemic.
People preparing to cut ribbon on new Fertitta Complex
Campus NewsNovember 1, 2019
A collection of local, national, and international news stories highlighting the people and programs of UNLV.
closeup of computer keyboard with HATE spelled out in red letters
ResearchOctober 2, 2019
UNLV sociologist on how interacting in online white supremacist networks can convert hateful words into real violence.
Concept illustration of a businessman trying to unplug the brain, sabotage, killing creativity
ResearchFebruary 21, 2019
Technology overload is harming our physical, mental, and social health, says a UNLV sociologist.