Peter B. Gray

Professor, Anthropology
Expertise: Evolution and Fatherhood, Evolution of Human Sexuality, Human-Animal Interactions

Biography

Peter Gray's research interests broadly span the evolution of human reproductive behavior, comparative primate behavior and behavioral and reproductive endocrinology.

Gray has authored articles and book chapters on topics including male testosterone and social behavior, age-related changes in physiology and behavior, evolution and variation in fathering, links between sexuality and parenting, body image, and human-pet relationships. Several of these recent publications -- such as on dating and sexual activity of single parents, and the role of pet dogs and cats in human dating and courtship -- have attracted wider media attention.

He is the co-author of Evolution and Human Sexual Behavior (Harvard University Press, 2013), a comprehensive, one-volume survey of the evolutionary science of human sexual behavior and why sexuality has remained a core fascination of human beings throughout time and across cultures. He is the co-author of Fatherhood: Evolution and Human Paternal Behavior (Harvard University Press, 2010), a book that integrates evolutionary, comparative, cross-cultural, and neuroendrocrine aspects of fatherhood, with attention given to the impacts of fatherhood on men's physiology, sexuality, and health, among other areas. He has also co-edited Endocrinology of Social Relationships (Harvard University Press, 2009), a volume that considers evolutionary, comparative, and endocrine aspects of pair bonding, parent-child and other relationships.

Education

  • B.A., Geography/Environmental Studies, UCLA

  • B.A., Anthropology, UCLA
  • A.M., Biological Anthropology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D., Biological Anthropology, Harvard University

Peter B. Gray In The News

Toronto Sun
June 26, 2020
Guys – are you looking for love during these uncertain times? Get a dog. Make it a French bulldog, a puppy for best results.
Anthropologist on the Street Podcast
June 15, 2020
Anthropology graduate student Lyndsey Craig examines pubic hair removal practices across 72 societies, and how the practices are tied to cultural concerns about hygiene and sexual activity. Whereas most literature on public hair removal practices focus primarily on Western cultures, in particular how women are included in and affected by marketing, pornography, and pop culture, Craig and biological anthropologist Dr. Peter Gray performed historical, cross-cultural research across dozens of non-Western societies. They found that whether and how pubic hair was removed depended on a diverse array of cultural messages about hygiene, fertility, sexuality and beauty.
The Scientist
November 15, 2019
That old joke about the milkman fathering many of a town’s children—it’s far from true, a new study reaffirms.
Newsweek
November 14, 2019
Scientists have pinpointed the members of society most likely to have children out of wedlock, by mapping the DNA of people in a region of Western Europe over the past 500 years.

Articles Featuring Peter B. Gray

unlv professor arya udry looks at a meteorite that she's holding up to the light
ResearchDecember 26, 2019
A collection of stories featuring interesting discoveries driven by UNLV that have made news in 2019.
football players look up at fireworks display
Campus NewsDecember 2, 2019
A collection of local, national, and international news stories highlighting the people and programs of UNLV.
silhouette of woman holding razor against blue background
ResearchJune 4, 2019
New UNLV study lays bare cultural reasons around the globe for bikini waxing and man-scaping.
Portrait of Peter Gray, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Campus NewsFebruary 16, 2018
First of its kind study looked at UNLV’s 8-Bit team as it readies for Mountain West Showdown against Boise State University.