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journalism and media studies Accomplishments

Nov 30, 2017
Gregory Borchard (Journalism & Media Studies) earned recognition with a top faculty paper award with his presentation at the 25th Symposium on the 19th Century Press, the Civil War, and Free Expression at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. "Press Responses to Republicans and Romanism in the 1856 Election: 'Free Men, Free Speech, Free Press, Free Territory, and Fremont'" received the Award of Excellence, designated for detail and quality.

Oct 30, 2017
Stephen Bates (Journalism and Media Studies) is the author of "Is This the Best Philosophy Can Do? Henry R. Luce and A Free and Responsible Press" which appears in the Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly.

Oct 20, 2017
Benjamin Burroughs (Journalism and Media Studies) and Jeff Shuter are co-authors of a book chapter titled, "The Ethics of Sensory Ethnography" in the book Internet Research Ethics for the Social Age New Challenges, Cases, and Contexts, edited by Michael Zimmer and Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda. The book is published by Peter Lang. 

Oct 17, 2017
Donovan Conley (Communication Studies) and Benjamin Burroughs (Journalism and Media Studies) presented a paper, "Welcome to the Techno-Jungle: Black Mirror and the Traumas of Pre-Political Inoculation" at the Affect, Activism, and New Media Conference at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City in October. 

Aug 23, 2017
Kevin L. Stoker (Journalism and Media Studies) published a study on The New York Times' first chief South American correspondent in Journalism and Communication Monographs. "The Journalist Who Interpreted Too Much: The New York Times Courtship, Defense, and Betrayal of John W. White" chronicles the paper's coverage of Argentina and neighboring republics during the infamous decade of the 1930s. 

Aug 18, 2017
Julian Kilker (Journalism and Media Studies) was invited to present at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) photography group in Geneva, Switzerland, in July on collaborative efforts to document and protect public lands, including Nevada's Basin and Range and Gold Butte national monuments.

May 24, 2017
Benjamin Burroughs (Journalism and Media Studies) is the author of an article, "YouTube Kids: The App Economy and Mobile Parenting," which recently was published in the journal Social Media + Society. The article was part of a special issue on infancy and media and explores the growing relationship between media industries and the everyday viewing patterns and lives of young children. Specifically, this research focuses on the development of the YouTube Kids app, with well over 10 million downloads, which seeks to capture and monetize youth attention.    YouTube Kids: The App Economy and Mobile Parenting YouTube Kids: The App Economy and Mobile Parenting YouTube Kids: The App Economy and Mobile ParentingYouTube Kids: The App Economy and Mobile Parenting       YouTube Kids: The App Economy and Mobile Parenting  

Mar 9, 2017
Nancy Lough, James Hines (both Educational Psychology and Higher Education), and Margo Malik (Athletics) participated in the Sport and Recreation Law Association's 30th annual conference in Las Vegas this month. Lough, the invited keynote speaker, titled her talk, "If We Build It, Will They Come? Considering 30 Years of Sport Law and Policy." Additionally, Lough and Ph.D. student Hines presented "First and What's the Goal? A Legal Examination of North Carolina House Bill 2 (HB2) and Intercollegiate Athletics." Malik and Lough presented: "Title IX Compliance and Athletic Department Webpages: A Content Analysis." Malik also is a UNLV alum, having earned a master's degree in journalism and media studies in 2016.      

Mar 6, 2017
Gregory Borchard (Journalism and Media Studies) is the author of "Beyond Radicalism: The New-York Tribune's Whiggishness and Constructive Democracy," which appears in the March edition of Journalism & Communication Monographs.

Dec 16, 2016
Julian Kilker (Journalism and Media Studies) has written an article, “Annie and the Shaman: Exploring Data via Provocative Artifacts” that has been accepted by Leonardo, an MIT Press peer-reviewed journal exploring the application of contemporary science and technology to the arts. The article covers the development of an exploratory data visualization connecting two contexts with notable data histories: Nevada’s aboveground atomic testing and its Basin and Range region. The project uses onsite data visualizations to encourage researcher and public engagement, and the article’s subject is currently on a two-year tour throughout Nevada as part of the "Basin and Range" exhibit, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the state of Nevada.