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anthropology Accomplishments

Sep 21, 2018
Jennifer Kawi, Andrew Thomas Reyes, (both Nursing), and Rogelio A. Arenas (Anthropology) co-authored “Exploring Pain Management Among Asian Immigrants with Chronic Pain: Self-Management and Resilience," which is published online and will appear in the December issue of Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. Arenas is a Ph.D. candidate.

Sep 13, 2018
On Sept. 5 the Academic Success Center (ASC) celebrated its 10-year anniversary and as part of its celebration recognized former students, faculty, departments, and community leaders that have made the ASC such an exemplary center. They are: Dean’s Award - Carl Reiber (formerly of the provost's office) Dean’s Award - Regent Kevin Page Founder’s Award - Neal Smatresk (former UNLV president) Outstanding Impact Award - philanthropist Christina Hixson  Classified Dedication Award -  Monica McNeely (ASC) Full-time Faculty Dedication Award - Salvador Mora (ASC) Graduate Student Ambassador Award - John Starkey (Lee Business School) Alumni Award of Excellence - Devante Davis, '15 BS Public Administration Alumni Award of Excellence - Crestcencia Ortiz-Barnett, '10 BA Theatre Arts, '15 MA Theatre Arts Alumni Award of Excellence - Ashley Rapuano, '16 BA Theatre Arts Outstanding Graduate Award - Lily Sender, '18 BS Engineering - Mechanical Engineering Outstanding Graduate Award - Angelica Bustos, '16 BS Biology Outstanding Graduate Award - Ariana Burton, '18 BA Anthropology Outstanding Graduate Award - Nha Trang "Vivian" Sam, '17 BS Biology Lifetime Partner in Student Success - College of Liberal Arts Lifetime Partner in Student Success - University Libraries Lifetime Partner in Student Success - College of Engineering

Sep 7, 2018
Alyssa Crittenden (Anthropology), along with co-authors Coren Apicella (University of Pennsylvania) and Victoria Tobolsky (Harvard), received the 2018 Margo Wilson Award for the Best Paper of 2018 published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior.  

Aug 3, 2018
Peter Gray (Anthropology) and Jamaican colleagues published "Patterns and Predictors of Depressive Symptoms among Jamaican Fathers of Newborns" in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. The study draws upon the fatherhood arm of a Jamaican birth cohort study, JAKids, and is based on one of the largest samples investigating paternal depression. Findings of the study had previously been presented at the University of the West Indies and covered by the Jamaican Gleaner.

Jul 26, 2018
William Bauer, Michael Green, Greg Hise, Andy Kirk, and Michelle Turk (all History); Karen Harry (Anthropology); and Su Kim Chung and Claytee White (both Libraries) recently spoke as part of "Hoover Dam and the Shaping of the American West," a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute for College and University Faculty. Julian Kilker (Journalism) and Norma Flores (History) also were faculty members of the institute.

Jun 7, 2018
Ben Van Alstyne, Alexx Martinez, and Michelle Bosinger-Shannon (all Anthropology) recently completed a virtual reality online exhibit for the Lost City Museum. This exhibit showcases 30 three-dimensional, interactive models of artifacts. Van Alstyne is a doctoral student, while Martinez and Bosinger-Shannon are undergraduates.

Apr 3, 2018
Karen Harry (Anthropology) co-edited the book Life Beyond the Boundaries: Constructing Identity in Edge Regions of the North American Southwest, which recently was published by the University Press of Colorado.

Mar 19, 2018
Barbara Roth (Anthropology) is the author of the book Agricultural Beginnings in the American Southwest, which was awarded the 2017 New Mexico-Arizona Book Award in Anthropology/Archaeology. The book synthesizes current data on the introduction of domesticated plants and an agricultural way of life to U.S. Southwest.

Mar 12, 2018
Jeremy Smallwood (Astronomy), Sara Black (History), Tyler Stalbaum (Mechanical Engineering), and Cheryl Anderson (Anthropology) are the recipients of this year's Graduate College Outstanding Thesis & Dissertation Awards. Each year the college gives four awards — within each category, one for STEM and one for non-STEM. This year’s winners are: Outstanding Thesis (STEM): Jeremy Smallwood, master of science, astronomy, for  “Secular Resonances during Main-Sequence and Post-Main-Sequence Planetary System Dynamics” Outstanding Thesis (Non-STEM): Sara Black, master of arts, history, for “Homeland, Homestead, and Haven: The Changing Perspectives of Zion National Park, 1700-1930” Outstanding Dissertation (STEM): Tyler Stalbaum, doctor of philosophy, mechanical engineering, for “Ionic Electroactive Polymer Devices: Physics-Based Modeling with Experimental Investigation and Verification” Outstanding Dissertation (Non-STEM): Cheryl Anderson, doctor of philosophy, anthropology, for “The Bioarchaeology of Inequality during the Middle Bronze Age in Central Anatolia.

Mar 9, 2018
Kwang Kim (Mechanical Engineering), Debra Martin (Anthropology), and Gabriele Wulf (Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences) have been selected as UNLV's 2018 Distinguished Professor Award recipients. The awards recognize professors for their teaching and scholarship as well as their service to the community, the university, and their profession. Winners are selected by a committee of their peers. As part of the honor, each recipient receives a $5,000 addition to his or her base salary. The winners will be honored during the Academic Achievement Awards ceremony, which is set for 3 p.m. April 18 in the Student Union. Kim, the NV Energy Professor of Energy and Matter, was selected for this award on the basis of his scholarly record, and numerous grants and projects totaling millions of dollars. The award recognizes his contributions to UNLV through mentorship of diverse graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and visiting scholars. Selection committee members also lauded Kim’s ability to conduct research, while maintaining substantial administrative roles, such as chair of the mechanical engineering department. Martin, professor of anthropology, was selected for the award for her record of scholarly achievement, grants and awards, and service to her profession. The selection committee praised Martin for her scholarly and field work in bioarchaeology, which examines the effects of violence on human populations. Her work in creating an internship program with the Clark County coroner/medical examiner’s office is helping the community better understand patterns of violent death in Southern Nevada. Wulf, professor of kinesiology and nutrition sciences, was selected for the award based on her scholarly work and innovative teaching in kinesiology. The selection committee noted her published works, honors and awards, and the variety of courses that she teaches. Wulf’s work focuses on identifying key factors to learning motor skills and optimal performance, which can be applied to a number of fields such as sports, physical rehabilitation, performing arts, military training, and medical education.