Workshop: Drawing & Memory | Lance L. Smith

Lance Smith's work uses drawing, painting, and performance to speak their lived experience with particular attention to the impact of racial and gender identities. Smith hopes the work can help give voice to marginalized people in artistic spaces. (Photo: Krystal Ramirez)

Patssi Valdez, Portrait of Sylvia Delgado, c. early 1980s. Hand-painted photograph with ink and pastel, 20 x 36 in. (50.8 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Joel Wachs. Photo by Ian Byers-Gamber

Feb. 25, 2019

Drawing & Memory | Lance L. Smith

This workshop will guide you through a practice that unites conversation and group sharing with classic observational drawing techniques.

March 08, 2019  |  5:30 p.m.

Join us for an intimate tour and drawing workshop inspired by  Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. Led by Las Vegas artist Lance Smith, this workshop will guide you through a practice that unites conversation and group sharing with classic observational drawing techniques. Participants will focus on color, form, and the role of detail in portraiture. Bring a photograph of a loved one from the past. Art materials will be supplied. The workshop takes place at the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art from 5:30 - 7:30 on March 8, 2019.

Free. All are welcome.

Lance L. Smith is a fine artist and illustrator based in Las Vegas, NV. Since completing their BFA at UNLV, Smith has been active both in and out of the studio. Multiple local and national group exhibitions have featured their work, and the subject matter of those pieces ranged from political satire and commentary about race to portraiture and popular culture.

Lance’s work has attracted the attention of the media covering the arts in Las Vegas, including Paint This Desert, Nevada Public Radio, Las Vegas Review-Journal, and Desert Companion. Smith has also participated in community panels discussing their role as a Black Queer artist. Lance ’s work uses drawing, painting, and performance to speak their lived experience with particular attention to the impact of racial and gender identities. Smith hopes the work can help give voice to marginalized people in artistic spaces. 

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Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.Ais a traveling exhibition that explores the intersections among a network of over fifty artists. This historical exhibition is the first of its kind to excavate histories of experimental art practice, collaboration, and exchange by a group of Los Angeles based queer Chicanx artists between the late 1960s and early 1990s.

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. is curated by C. Ondine Chavoya and David Evans Frantz as part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, an initiative of the Getty to encourage ambitious research and exhibitions at Southern California cultural institutions. The exhibition is organized by ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries in collaboration with The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and organized as a traveling exhibition by Independent Curators International (ICI). Lead support for Axis Mundo is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation.

This exhibition is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support has been provided by The Calamus Foundation of New York, Inc., the City of West Hollywood through WeHo Arts—the City’s Arts Division and Arts & Cultural Affairs Commission, Kathleen Garfield, the ONE Archives Foundation, the USC Libraries, and the Luis Balmaseda Fund for Gay & Lesbian Archives, administered by the California Community Foundation. Funding for the exhibition tour has been provided by the generous support from ICI’s International Forum and the ICI Board of Trustees.

The presentation at the UNLV Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art has been organized in collaboration with support from Meow Wolf, The Intersection, UNLV Department of Interdisciplinary, Gender, and Ethnic Studies, MGM Resorts Art & Culture, and an anonymous gift in honor of Hilda Roop. Additional partners include UNLV Spectrum, Latinos Who Lunch, The Art People Podcast, UNLV Student Diversity & Social Justice, the UNLV Department of Art, UNLV Public History, and the UNLV College of Fine Arts.