One of our graduate students, Margaret Huettl, is featured on the OAH website.

Dec. 1, 2015

One of our graduate students, Margaret Huettl, is featured on the OAH website. - http://www.processhistory.org/?p=1128

Margaret Huettl is a doctoral candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She earned her master’s degree in history from the University of Oklahoma in 2010. Currently, she is a University Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, where she teaches in Ethnic Studies and is finishing her dissertation, which explores Anishinaabe sovereignty in the United States and Canada during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

OJIBWE PEOPLEHOOD IN THE NORTH AMERICAN WEST

Could you briefly describe your dissertation?

My project, “Ojibwe Peoplehood in the North American West from 1854–1954,” argues that Anishinaabeg Peoples redefined Anishinaabewaki (the Ojibwe homeland) in the face of Settler colonial programs intended to confine and ultimately eliminate Indigenous sovereignty and identity. Although scholars have usually considered the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—defined by confinement, dispossession, and marginalization—as the nadir of Indian history, I explore the persistence of Anishinaabe sovereignty. Eschewing race and nationhood, ways of thinking embedded in Western European epistemologies, I rely on “peoplehood,” a theory developed by American Indian Studies scholars, to articulate Ojibwe sovereignty. Anishinaabeg, like many of the names Native Americans use to identify themselves, means “the people.” ...

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