We Danced, We Sang, Until the Matron Came

When

Nov. 5, 2021, 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Campus Location

Office/Remote Location

Paul Harris Theatre
We Danced, We Sang, Until the Matron Came, Mixed media painting by artist Jean LaMarr

We Danced, We Sang, Until the Matron Came by artist Jean LaMarr. 

Description

We Danced, We Sang, Until the Matron Came is the title of a painting by Jean LaMarr, a community artist-activist, printmaker and muralist of Paiute/Pit River ancestry with family ties to Northern Nevada and Northern California. This performance shines a light on the history and cultural impact of Native American Boarding Schools, presenting a talk by Stacey Montooth, Executive Director of the State of Nevada Indian Commission, accompanied by the art of Jean LaMarr and documentation of the Stewart Indian Boarding School, Southeast of Carson City, Nevada, culminating in a dance of resilience.

This performance is part of the AH'-WAH-NEE Exhibition and Symposium, celebrating the beauty of Indigeneity through the art of local and regional Native American Women artists. For our out-of-town audience or those who cannot attend in person, the event will be live streamed on the UNLV College of Fine Arts YouTube channel.

Stacey Montooth, a citizen of the Walker River Paiute Nation, is the Executive Director of the State of Nevada Indian Commission (NIC), appointed by Governor Steve Sisolak on Sept. 1, 2019. A member of his cabinet, Montooth is the liaison from Governor Sisolak to the 27 Nevada Tribes, bands, and colonies.

A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Montooth has spent over a decade in service to Nevada Tribes. From 2012-2019, Montooth worked at the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony as the Tribe’s first public relations/community information officer. Upon returning to Northern Nevada, Montooth was the Indian Education liaison for her alma mater, Churchill County High in Fallon, Nev. Before returning home to the Great Basin, Montooth spent nearly 12 years working in community relations, primarily in higher education and college athletics.

Sol Martinez, Kadie Anderson, Jared Chee-Anderson, and Gianna Yazzie will be performing dances of resilience. Pow Wow dance styles include Fancy Shawl, Jingle, and Traditional Dance. The dancers are from the Las Vegas Paiute Tribal community with ancestral connections to Indian Boarding School survivors. 

Jean LaMarr is a community artist-activist of Paiute/Pit River ancestry with family ties to Northern Nevada and northern California. Her work is on view in the Ah’-Wah-Nee exhibition, and a survey of her work will be presented at the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, Nevada in 2022.

Doors open at 7PM. 

ASL interpreters will be present throughout the remarks. Entry to the event is free and open to everyone. Visitor parking on the UNLV campus during the event is also free starting at 7PM on Thursday and 1PM on Friday. Wear a mask.

This event is funded, in part by WESTAF (the Western States Arts Federation) and the National Endowment for the Arts. 

For more information about the exhibition and symposium, visit the AH'-WAH-NEE website. 

Price

Free

Admission Information

Open to everyone. 

Contact Information

External Sponsor

This event is funded, in part by WESTAF (the Western States Arts Federation), the Nevada Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts.