Debate-Related Courses

In anticipation of hosting the final 2016 Presidential Debate, UNLV will be offering courses this fall that are designed to relate directly to issues connected with the upcoming election. Register now to take these one-of-a-kind courses.

COLA 100LA (3 Credits)

First Year Seminar: Presidential Debates and U.S. Elections

Majid Shirali

This course will introduce students to university life and the University Undergraduate Learning Outcomes by exploring a specific topic area and the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed as an undergraduate. The topic area will focus on the history of Presidential debates in the U.S. and their impact in American politics.

COM 330 (3 Credits)

Special Topics in Communication Studies: Presidential Debates

David Henry and Jacob Thompson

History and criticism of televised presidential debates, 1960-2016. Topics for analysis include, but are not limited to, political contexts, candidates' communication strategies and tactics, public perceptions and receptions, and media roles in campaign coverage.

COM 789 (3 Credits)

Select Topics in Communication: Presidential Debates

David Henry and Jacob Thompson

Graduate-level exploration of the history and criticism of televised presidential debates, 1960-2016. Topics for analysis include, but are not limited to, political contexts, candidates' communication strategies and tactics, public perceptions and receptions, and media roles in campaign coverage.

HIST 279–1001 (1 Credit)

The News in Historical Perspective: Race, Class, and Gender in the 2016 Election

AB Wilkinson

This course explores themes surrounding race, class, and sex/gender have been at the forefront of U.S. politics and the upcoming 2016 Presidential Election. Readings will include online articles that explore current debates along with the various political positions political candidates and others take on these issues.

HIST 279–1002 (1 Credit)

The News in Historical Perspective: Issues Facing the 2016 Presidential Candidates

Cian McMahon

This course is designed to deepen students’ historical understandings of the topics at hand in the debate. Over the course of 10 classes, 10 faculty members from UNLV’s History Department will offer critical, historical perspectives on the major issues facing the candidates in the 2016 presidential election.

HIST 453/653 (3 Credits)

Women and Gender in Politics

Joanne Goodwin

This course explores the ways in which politics has been and continues to be shaped by gender. The course explores the diverse strategies used by women to organize for (and against) gender equality and social justice in the United States. While addressing the changes in women’s lives in the twentieth century, the course also introduces students to contemporary women who have become leaders in their communities.

HIST 388-1002 (3 Credits)

Great Personalities in History: Presidential Candidates and the Election

Michael Green

Great Personalities in History: Presidential Candidates and the Election (3 credits, Dr Michael Green). This course examines how politics and campaigning have changed through American history. The course lectures, discussion, and guest speakers will give special attention to key elections and to current events, comparing how the past and present are similar and different.

JOUR 310 (3 Credits)

Advanced Reporting

Gregory Borchard

The course provides advanced training and practice in gathering and writing news, focusing on feature writing and students will be supplied a focus for three different assignments — a profile, a feature, and a campus event, which will all use the debate as the topic of each assignment.

JOUR 490 (3 Credits)

Special Topics: Debate and Election Coverage

Gary Larson

Students will meet twice per week and will provide social media support, as well as a short public relations campaign to attract viewers to our live-stream, particularly students here at UNLV, Nevada State, CSN, and area high schools. Students will also help with the debate day coverage in the field, the studio, or both. This course utilizes the skills and knowledge that our students have gained in all their classes. Media production students will be filing stories from both on- and off-campus meetings on the night of the debate and the evening of the general election. IMC students will be doing publicity for our shows. Students with expertise in social media will make our social media footprint is as large as possible. And finally, our Latino students will be doing news reports in Spanish for our Latino viewers.

PSC 305 (3 Credits)

The American Presidency

Ted Jelen

The course explores the history an evolution of the American Presidency, from 1787 to the present, including elections and the importance of televised debates. The course also provides analysis of the powers of the President and the relationship of the office to the American political system. 

PSC 401G (3 Credits)

Political Campaigns and Elections 

Dan Lee

Analyzing an election campaign of choice, students have an opportunity to integrate practical experience with selected readings and discussions on campaigns and elections.

PSC 401O (3 Credits)

U.S. Elections and Governance

David Damore

This course investigates the causes and consequences of the growing chasm between contemporary electoral politics and the capacity for governance in the United States and evaluates potential reforms to each of those processes. The course is part of the Brookings Public Policy minor (the department contributes two of the six required courses for this minor, which is housed in Brookings Mountain West at UNLV). Professor Damore will lecture, but it also includes guest lecture from senior scholars from the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. 

SOC 776 (3 Credits)

Seminar in Political Sociology

Barbara G. Brents

Politics goes far beyond the endless battles between Republicans and Democrats. Political power in contemporary society entails a much more complex interplay of relations completely outside what we traditionally think of as political arenas. This course will explore current perspectives on the social contexts of the contemporary state and political power including machinations of class, race, gender and sexual power.